Please let me know if there is any possible cure right now for cauda equina syndrome?

Surgery or . Extremely constrictive, long term bracing in very specific circumstances are the only options. This deals with pressure on specific nerves as they start to divide after the base of the spinal cord and continued compression can lead to paralysis. Surgery is usually recommended.

Related Questions

Is there a cure for cauda equina syndrome?

Surgery. Cauda equina is a syndrome that causes numbness and weakness to the lower extremities from a severe compression of the nerve roots in the lumbar spine. In addition it can cause urinary or bowel problems. This is a surgical emergency and requires a decompressive procedure so to not be left with permanent nerve damage. Read more...
A laminectomy . This syndrome is due to compression of the nerve tissue that can be from several causes. Depending on the cause & location of the problem, the surgery is a decompression of the nerve tissue usually through a laminectomy but can be from an anterior or lateral approach or combined &may or may not involve a fusion & instrumentation as well. Surgery needs to be done emergently for chance of cure. Read more...

Diagnosed with cauda equina syndrome. Underwent surgery, so its all good now. Just wanted to know if smoking can be a huge obstacle in my healing?

Yes. You know that all doctors will tell you that smoking is bad , but on a serious note, most surgeons feel that smoking leads to poor bone healing. Quitting is not easy, but i'd ask your regular doctor if they can assist you with any smoking cessation program. Read more...

Does botox helps patients having neurogenic bladder due to partial cauda equina syndrome? Interstim didn't helped now should I try botox for bladder?

Likely to help. Botox injections are both indicated and efficacious for bladder spasticity causing neurogenic bladder. Although i provide Botox for different indications, i know doctors who successfully treat neurogenic bladder of various causes this way. Good luck! Read more...
See below. It may be helpful, but only a urologist who knows your case can advise you on that issue. Read more...

I am 6 mths post op from Lamonectomy L5 S1 with cauda equina syndrome. Still in debilitating pain in low back but now in left hip. The Dr. Is no help?

Cauda equina. It is sometimes difficult to treat the pain of this condition. How is your mobility, and bowel and bladder function? If pain is the remaining problem, there will usually be some benefit to working with a pain specialist. There are many treatments that can help. Some of them are medicines, some of them are not. Since you have had the symptoms for months, this would be a good place for advice. Read more...

Can you please discuss cauda equina syndrome and how will it effect me?

Lower nerves. Syndrome due to dysfunction of the nerve roots emanating from the bottom of the spinal cord. May consist of lower extremity weakness, sensation changes of the saddle and genital areas, bladder dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, sexual dysfunction and pain. Read more...

What is cauda equina syndrome?

Nerve compression. A cauda equina syndrome involves the lumbar spine below the tip of the spinal cord, which usually ends at the l1-2 disc space. The syndrome involves compression of all of the nerves within the spinal canal and is an acute emergency. There are a variety of problems that can compromise the spinal canal such as massive disc ruptures, abcess, hematoma, and tumors. Bladder dysfunction is common. Read more...

What is cauda equina syndrome?

Pressure on nerves . This syndrome occurs due to pressure on the nerves in the lumbar spinal canal. After the spinal cord ends, the nerves going down to the legs and bladder form a collection of stringlike structures called the "horse tail" or cauda equina in latin. Severe pressure on this group of nerves can cause profound leg weakness, and loss of bladder/bowel control. This usually occurs due to large disc bulges. Read more...

What is cauda equina syndrome?

Compression. Cauda equina is the cluster of nerve roots distal to the end of the spinal cord in the lumbosacral cistern, at the lower back. Compression due to disc rupture, tumor, or narrowing can cause leg weakness, and/or numbness, inability to initiate urination, constipation or diarrhea, and various expressions of pain. Can be lumber stenosis, which is gradual. All of the above need evaluation, ?Op. Read more...