2 doctors weighed in:

Can venous stasis lead to decreased venous return?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care

In brief: Venous stasis

The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs.
This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction...

In brief: Venous stasis

The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs.
This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction...
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Thank
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Phlebology

In brief: Sort of

Venous stasis is a condition of skin changes which is due to an abnormality in Venous return.
It is generally cost by Val problems that allow blood from high-pressure veins to enter the low-pressure veins that my under the skin. These veins respond to this increased pressure by becoming large, letting fluid go through their loss creating swelling, letting blood go through their loss creating discoloration and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin. This results in ulcers.

In brief: Sort of

Venous stasis is a condition of skin changes which is due to an abnormality in Venous return.
It is generally cost by Val problems that allow blood from high-pressure veins to enter the low-pressure veins that my under the skin. These veins respond to this increased pressure by becoming large, letting fluid go through their loss creating swelling, letting blood go through their loss creating discoloration and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin. This results in ulcers.
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Thank
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