How long does it take for recovery from a molar tooth extraction?

Six weeks. Removing a tooth, especially a molar is a big deal. It leaves a surface wound the size of half a dollar bill, that can become infected if food is present, followed by bacteria. Often it is already infected prior to extraction that can lead to a systemic bacteremia. This is been blamed for plaque deposits in arteries. Follow all instructions, keep hygiene good, liquid diet for five days.
Depends. Assuming you have no health issues, do not smoke and follow the recommended instructions of your doctor, it can be a few days. However, sometimes, the procedure can be more involved and an infection can be present. If so, the recovery period can be 1 week or more. Also, the skill level of the doctor will be a factor. Good luck!
Depends! Everyone is different - depends on why the tooth has to come out and maybe on the skill of the dentist. Also on how well you take care of it after the surgery. And on your general health or medications you may be taking. Good question to ask the dentist who you are considering taking the tooth out.

Related Questions

I was just wondering when am I allowed to eat "normal" food after a molar tooth extraction?

Post extraction. Usually after 24 hours you can resume a normal diet with a single tooth extraction. Read more...
1-2 weeks. After an extraction, it is best to be careful. Avoid crispy, hard, crunchy foods for at least a week after the extraction. Read more...

Does molar tooth extraction require surgery?

Not always. Molar tooth extraction can be simple with no surgery involved in many cases. Sometimes if a tooth is badly broken, or has had a root canal treatment in past that tooth may not come out easily and will need surgery. Also most unerupted and impacted third molars will need surgery to extract. Read more...
Discuss with dentist. The extraction of any tooth is actually a surgery, but some extractions are more straightforward than others, and therefore, healing time and experience may vary depending on why the extraction was needed and condition of the tooth and surrounding area. Your dentist will discuss this and any anticipated complications before the procedure is begun. Read more...
Molar extractions. All extractions technically are surgery. Some are more complex than others. Some quick, others require more time. Your doctors aim is to get you better with the least amount of discomfort. Just ask. They are happy to answer all your questions before they get started. They will make sure your are really numb and that you have adequate pain meds afterwards. They have your best interest at heart. Read more...
Removal of bone. Surgical extraction usually require removal of bones. They are more invasive than regular extractions molar extractions can be either check with dentist. Read more...
Sometimes. Sometimes. Depends on the tooth and skill of the DDS. See an oral surgeon for best results. Read more...

I had a left molar tooth extraction 3 days ago and now my tooth right next to it is very sensitive to touch with a toothbrush. Is this normal?

Several Causes. Teeth are extracted for several reasons. If impacted or advanced periodontal bone loss, then some of the root surface on the tooth next to it may be exposed. If extracted for decay, you may have decay on the remaining tooth next to it. See your dentist for diagnosis and treatment. Read more...
Yes. The bone around the extraction site is inflamed and may be causing that tooth to be sensitive. Give it some time and things should settle down; you can always have your dentist take a look at it. Read more...
Multiple. After an extraction the root surface of the adjacent tooth could be exposed which can cause sensitivity to brushing and cold. Other causes could be the bruising and swelling that follow an extraction or infection. I suggest you use warm salt water rinses several times a day and use sensitive tooth paste.You should follow up with your dentist if the sensitivity persist for more than a week. Read more...
No, but common. While sensitivity is not normal, it is a common occurrence. It may be related to the adjacent tooth temporarily having no gum covering the root surface. As the extraction site heals, the sensitivity usually subsides. It may also be related to local inflammation. If it does not get better, have your dentist take a look to make sure no other treatment is necessary. Read more...

I have a salty tasting discharge after upper molar tooth extraction. The extraction was 3 days ago. No pain or fever.

Post op. You should call the dentist who extracted the tooth to have that area re-evaluated to make sure everything is healing properly and there are no other problems with adjacent teeth. This is something that cannot be done over the internet. Read more...