How long does diarrhea and vomiting associated with gastroenteritis last?

It depends on cause. Most viral gastroenteritis last an average of 3 days, some may last up to a week. The most important thing to consider is how well hydrated the child is, and if the child is able to keep fluids down. Be familiar with signs of dehydreation and consult your docor.
It can be variable. The diarrhea can last up to 2 wks. The vomiting often lasts 2-3 days. Here is a little on vomiting for you http://www.Youtube.Com/watch?V=axhkggkon4q.

Related Questions

Are there any effective over-the-counter medications to stop diarrhea and vomiting associated with gastroenteritis?

Clear liquid diet. It is imortant to keep the infant hydrated and prevent dehydration if he is vomiting. Therefore clear liquid diet is preferred. If the mother is breastfeeding she should stop solid foods and continue breastfeeding frequently. There are no over the counter medication to cure vomiting and diarrhea. Read more...
Yes. Imodium (loperamide) a-d is available. Never use in children unless directed by your doctor (hardly any pediatrician will recommend). In older kids (over 12) and adults use cautiously only if diarrhea is watery, with no fever or abdominal pain and is causing dehydration (excessive loss of fluids) and you are not being able to drink enough back up. Read more...

Aside from diarrhea and vomiting, what are the symptoms of gastroenteritis?

Dehydration. Apart from vomiting and diarrhea, the main concern in children with gastroenteritis is dehydration. Signs of dehydration include decreased urine production (you will notice this if you're changing less wet diapers than usual), dry lips, sunken fontanel in infants, dry skin, crying without tears, and decreased activity level. Read more...

How long does stomach flu last? Symptoms: temp range from 97*-100.4* diarrhea (12 hours of it on 2 different days) migraine vomiting (briefly, but nauseated the entire week) I got these symptoms last monday and was sick through friday. Had a brief relaps

You . You may be dealing with a bacterial infectious process. For this you will need antibiotics. Your doctor may want to do some tests of your stool to check for certain pathogens prior to treatment. In the meantime maintain hydration and eat a bland diet until you improve. I hope you are better soon. Read more...
Varies. After a week get a medical consult with bloodwork to see if your blood electrolytes are off due to deydration, and possible bacterial cultures to rule out bacterial food poisoning. Read more...

My neighbour's son had diarrhea and vomiting for about 2 weeks. How long will he be contagious for after these symptoms go away?

A "Loose" Link. Diarrhea, in and of itself, is not always related to infection so it is impossible to say whether this individual is or is not contagious. Proper hand washing by a supervising parent should minimize risk of spread within the household and to others outside the home if this were infectious. In most viral cases, your infectious before symptoms start. With bacteria and parasites during and after. Read more...

How long to wait before taking solid food after diarrhea and vomiting?

Food after sickness. This will vary, but usually start with clears. If okay advance to soft, mushy food (banana, rice, oatmeal) and as better move to a regular diet. Don't overindulge too early and avoid the alcohol soda until better. Starting a probiotic can help your body's healthy gut bacteria recover faster. Drink lots of water. Read more...

Are diarrhea and vomiting symptoms of malabsorption? If so, how much will the symptoms last? I believe that my baby doesn't tolerate oatmeal...

Diarrhea. Malabsorption is usually diarrhea. Malabsorption usually means poor weight gain and sick infants. If this is so please go see your pediatrician or GI specialist. If otherwise growing the V&D could be formula intolerance to milk or perhaps soy. Try an elemental formula like nutramagen or alimentum. If you think oatmeal then stop and start it later to see if change helps. See your dr too . Read more...