2 doctors weighed in:

How typical are micropsia and alice in wonderland syndrome in children?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lynne Weixel
Clinical Psychology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No good data

This is not quite rare, but also not common.
It is more often reported in children but can occur at any age. It is not a mental illness, but a physical perceptual distortion and is usually not part of a dangerous condition. It may be associated w/ migraines or tle and a neurologist might help. Try not to worry about 'craziness' - it is not that. Wish i could offer #s, but i can't.

In brief: No good data

This is not quite rare, but also not common.
It is more often reported in children but can occur at any age. It is not a mental illness, but a physical perceptual distortion and is usually not part of a dangerous condition. It may be associated w/ migraines or tle and a neurologist might help. Try not to worry about 'craziness' - it is not that. Wish i could offer #s, but i can't.
Dr. Lynne Weixel
Dr. Lynne Weixel
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Lynne Weixel
http://www.aliceinwonderlandsyndrome.net/Alice-in-Wonderland-Syndrome-Treatment.html
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral

In brief: It's both rare & probably

under-reported. A pediatric Neuro-Ophthalmologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia reported that 25% of his 50 patients with AIWS seen over 10 years developed migraines; 1, seizures.
Visual distortions, micropsia & macropsia, of one's body parts & of objects rarely persist to adulthood. Functional MRI during an episode shows hypoactivity of occipital & hyperactivity of parietal lobes.

In brief: It's both rare & probably

under-reported. A pediatric Neuro-Ophthalmologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia reported that 25% of his 50 patients with AIWS seen over 10 years developed migraines; 1, seizures.
Visual distortions, micropsia & macropsia, of one's body parts & of objects rarely persist to adulthood. Functional MRI during an episode shows hypoactivity of occipital & hyperactivity of parietal lobes.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Liu AM, Liu JG, Liu GW, Liu GT. "Alice in wonderland" syndrome: presenting & follow-up characteristics. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Sep;51(3):317-20 . To ask if Dr. Grant Liu's staff can give you names of pediatric neuro-ophthalmologists or pediatric neurologists & ophthalmologists at nearby medical schools to whom the child's pediatrician can refer, call 215-590-2791. Lewis Carroll used it well.
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Shontae Buffington
Board Certified, Pediatrics
14 years in practice
873K people helped
Continue
111,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors