Can someone with borderline personality disorder also have antisocial personality disorder?

Yes. These two personality disorders actually have some similarities and fall under the same group called cluster b personality disorders.
Traits. You may not have a diagnosable personality disorder. You can, however, exhibit traits from one or more personality disorders even if full criteria is not met for a diagnosis. You may also have a concurrent mental illness and a personality disorder. Many possibilities, only your psychologist or psychiatrist can positively diagnose you.

Related Questions

Is it possibly someone with antisocial personality disorder also suffer from borderline personality disorder?

Not really. They are very different. Antisocial people don't really care for others, use people for their own means, do not have sincere emotions. In Borderline personality, people actually might care too much and don't know what to do with their feelings (so will react very extreme to a breakup or with friends). It might appear to overlap (both can have problems with anger), but they are different. Read more...

Could I have borderline personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder?

Borderline-antisocia. Yes you can have both - typically there are very similar qualities in both disorders. The primary difference that with antisocial there is a disregard for others and social norms and often criminal behavior. Borderline fears abandonment, whereas antisocial does not typically have that characteristic. Read more...
Personality disorder. There is that possibility. Best thing to do is have a consultation visit with a psychiatrist for more education and treatment options, if you wish to follow through with this. Read more...

How come some people confuse borderline personality disorder with antisocial personality disorder?

Different things. They are different things, but it is possible to have both. Both personality disorders may be characterized by recklessness, impulsivity, and manipulativeness. The causes are different, but some behaviors may superficially look the same. Borderline personality can be treated. True psychopathic or sociopathic personality is unlikely to respond to treatment. Read more...

How common is it for someone to have borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, and antisocial personality disorder?

Statistics. Estimates regarding the prevalence of borderline personality disorder (bpd) in the general population have suggested a 1 – 2% rate of lifetime occurrence (apa, 2000). The nmih cites that the prevalence of bipolar in adults in the us is 2.6% and antisocial personality disorder to be at 1%. If you have concerns about any or all of these, seek help. Doctors are trained to help and not judge. Best. Read more...
Complicated. There is high "comorbidity" (co-occurrence) of personality disorders (pds) so it is common for someone to get diagnosed with more than one pd. Bipolar is complicated... Many patients with borderline pd get misdiagnosed as "bipolar ii" by psychiatrists who do not really understand pds. On the other hand, if a person has bipolar disorder, they may be at increased risk of developing a pd as well. Read more...
Diagnosis. This is quite unlikely. Also, any of these diagnoses should be made by a seasoned psychiatrist, as these diagnoses are incredibly serious and can have some overlap. Read more...

How common is it for someone to have borderline personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and bipolar disorder all together?

Not very common. There can be instances of borderline personality disorder with bipolar disorder but the delineation of the episodes of bbipolar disorder can be masked by borderline personality disorder. Read more...
Co-occurence common. The "comorbidity" (co-occurrence) of personality disorders is high, so if someone meets the diagnostic criteria for *any* personality disorder (pd), they are likely to meet the diagnostic criteria for as many as four to six pds. This reflects (in part) a limitation of dsm-iv/5 (the psychiatric diagnostic manual). Bipolar mood disorder is a different animal, but can co-exist with a pd. Read more...

How do you know if someone has antisocial personality disorder? What are the symptoms?

See below. People with this condition show a long standing pattern of anti-social attitudes and behaviors, including some of these: 1) lack of guilt, remorse, and care towards others; 2) minimal consideration of social norms and rules; 3) few close relationships; 4) trouble dealing with frustration and anger; and 5) a tendency to blame others. Causes are usually genetics & environmental factors combined. Read more...
Antisocial. The hallmark of this disorder is the person seems to have no conscience, or sense of morality, or right or wrong. This person cannot empathize with others, is opportunistic, predatory, and often thrill seeking. An example of this would be Charles Manson. Read more...

Is it ok if someone with antisocial personality disorder form a relationship?

Yes but. This type of relationship can never be healthy. If formed with another antisocial person, it can result in serious criminal activities. If formed with a social person, it will destroy the social person. Antisocial personalitiies need serious treatment in order to proceed with what we consider as a normal productive healthy life with anyone including themselves. Read more...
Yes -- scary ones. Antisocial personality disorder people do form exploitative relationships. They also lie, cheat, and have no remorse for this or for using others. They can be extremely cold when you do not meet their needs. If the partner is more capable of genuine empathy and care, s/he will be emotionally harmed by this behavior -- and could also be devastated in other ways (including financial). Read more...

What are the steps taken to cure someone of antisocial personality disorder?

Wish to change. Work with a therapist to discover the causation and develop tools for better communication skills. Often apd results from early disfunctional family interactions, which lead to low self esteem, and a felt need to protect oneself from anticipated rejection. Identifying positive aspects of yourself may allow you to be more comfortable, hence less defensive in relation to others. Read more...
Antisocial. The hallmark of this disorder is the person seems to have no conscience, or sense of morality, or right or wrong. This person cannot empathize with others, is opportunistic, predatory, and often thrill seeking. An example of this would be Charles Manson. There generally is no "curing" these people, as they are extremely resistant to treatment. Read more...