Can a newborn have a congenital heart defect?

Yes. Yes, it is a heart defect you are born with. It may be simple, moderate, or very serious. They include "holes in the heart", valve problems, malformed or absent chambers, valves, or blood vessels. Just under 1 % of all babies are born with some type of defect, often minor and temporary. They are usually diagnosed shortly after birth, occasionally much later.

Related Questions

What are the symptoms of a congenital heart defect?

They vary widely. A congenital heart defect may be so mild that there are no symptoms during an individual's lifetime. At the other end of the spectrum, there may be severe distress at the time of birth. There are many different types of congenital heart defects and levels of severity such that a description of common symptoms is usually related to a specific defect. Read more...
Lots of symptoms. Can be related to chd. Rhythm problems, dizziness, fainting, water accumulation in legs or torso, difficulty breathing, nightly cough, weakness..... And lots more. Read more...

What can cause a fever in a child with a congenital heart defect?

Same as others. Children in general are prone to recurrent viral infections, regardless of their cardiac status. If otherwise healthy and not recently post-op, common causes of fever should be considered. Fevers that develop while hospitalized for cardiac conditions are far more concerning and different than those found in the general population. . Read more...

How could they miss it? Feeling sick about a grandchild with a congenital heart defect?

See Below. Not all congenital heart disease is identifiable before birth, or in the immediate neonatal period. Some become detectable around 4 weeks of age. Read more...

Will running be too much stress on the heart for someone with a congenital heart defect?

That really depends. On the health of the individual and the specific type of defect. That individual's cardiologist/ physician should be able to educate about any limitations with exercise. Read more...

What sort of disease is a congenital heart defect?

Born with it. It is a heart defect you are born with. It may be simple, moderate, or very serious. They include "holes in the heart", valve problems, malformed or absent chambers, valves, or blood vessels. Just under 1 % of all babies are born with some type of defect, often minor and temporary. They are usually diagnosed shortly after birth, occasionally much later. Read more...

How do doctors diagnose a congenital heart defect? What tests are done?

Physical exam/tests. Today, many infants CHD is picked up on a pre-natal ultrasound done for other reasons.Others are suspected at birth due to physical findings, which can be confirmed by an EKG and a cardiac ultrasound. Sometimes other studies like a Holter monitor or a cardiac cath are needed. The tools used are guided by the physicians pursuing the findings. Actually listening to the heart can often give an answer. Read more...

What does the diagnostic investigation of a congenital heart defect include?

Varies. For some infants with an asymptomatic hole in the lower chamber (vsd), i may limit my investigation to a chest x-ray, ekg and echocardiogram to confirm my clinical impression. If a kid presents with a worrisome murmur or symptoms, i may send them to a specialty center for this and a review by the pediatric cardiologist. Read more...
Several things. It includes a thorough history, a careful physical examination, an ecg, and an echocardiogram. Read more...

If one sibling has a congenital heart defect, should all siblings get a heart echo?

Not necessarily. This depends on the nature of the heart defect. Some are picked up because there is a murmur that is significant. Usually siblings do not need an echo just because one does. If there is a genetic predisposition like in idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis then the siblings might all need to be checked out. That is easily determined by your physician and cardiologist. Read more...
No. Have them seen by their pediatrician who might want to obtain an ecg, but if the medical history is unremarkable, the child has no symptoms and is growing well, the physical exam is normal and the ECG shows no problem there is usually no need for an echo. Read more...
It depends . The answer depends on the likelihood of a genetic influence, and the likelihood of being able to diagnose with physical examination. Some congenital heart defects, such as bicuspid aortic valve, are more likely to have a genetic influence and may be difficult to diagnose by examination. Others, such as a vsd, have low likelihood of genetic influence and high accuracy with diagnosis by exam. Read more...