17 doctors weighed in:
I think I have "polycystic ovary syndrome" but i'm not sure. What blood tests can be done to check?
17 doctors weighed in

Dr. Khurram Rehman
Fertility Medicine
8 doctors agree
In brief: You do need tests
Two reasons for blood tests - first to diagnose pcos, we need 2 out of 3 of 1.
Irregular periods 2. Clinical signs like acne, hair growth and/or blood tests showing too much male-type hormones (androgens) 3. Ultrasound appearance of polycystic ovaries. Second we need to "rule out" other causes of irregular cycles, acne, hair growth: thyroid, prolactin, adrenal gland issues. See OB or fertility md.

In brief: You do need tests
Two reasons for blood tests - first to diagnose pcos, we need 2 out of 3 of 1.
Irregular periods 2. Clinical signs like acne, hair growth and/or blood tests showing too much male-type hormones (androgens) 3. Ultrasound appearance of polycystic ovaries. Second we need to "rule out" other causes of irregular cycles, acne, hair growth: thyroid, prolactin, adrenal gland issues. See OB or fertility md.
Dr. Khurram Rehman
Dr. Khurram Rehman
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1 comment
Dr. Khurram Rehman
Possible tests include Total Testosterone, DHEAS, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, Estradiol, FSH, LH, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Prolactin, and Antimullerian Hormone (AMH). If PCOS is found tests of insulin resistance ('pre-diabetes') include Fasting Glucose, Fasting Insulin, and Hemoglobin A1c.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology
7 doctors agree
In brief: Consider none
As a pathologist who's devoted my life to the lab, there's no substitute for a history and physical exam. Ultrasound of the ovaries in the right clinical setting can clinch the diagnosis and your physician may not even need this to justify treatment.
Lab testing for this isn't going to make or break the diagnosis.

In brief: Consider none
As a pathologist who's devoted my life to the lab, there's no substitute for a history and physical exam. Ultrasound of the ovaries in the right clinical setting can clinch the diagnosis and your physician may not even need this to justify treatment.
Lab testing for this isn't going to make or break the diagnosis.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
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2 comments
Dr. Khurram Rehman
Lab testing is part of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for PCOS since 2003, often called the Rotterdam criteria. These are very useful in that they recognize 'regular cycle PCOS' or older women with hyperandrogenism and irregular cycles who don't have the typical ultrasound appearance due to diminished ovarian reserve. PCOS is a diagnosis of exclusion too e.g. CAH, thyroid disorder
Dr. Daniel Rychlik
I agree the no testing and just treating is a very bad idea. PCOS "looks" like so many other diseases that have completely different treatments. It is unfortunate that someone would suggest this as we often get women diagnosed with PCOS and really have Late onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree
In brief: Wait a Minute
Pcos is much more complicated than a simple ultrasound.
This is based upon increasing knowledge of the ramifications of the problem.Thus bloodwork is part of the exam. And because it often [presents prior to the onser of puberty, a pediatrician or peds endocrinology is appropriate, not ob-gyn.The other docs commenting have , unfortunately, not as much peds experience.

In brief: Wait a Minute
Pcos is much more complicated than a simple ultrasound.
This is based upon increasing knowledge of the ramifications of the problem.Thus bloodwork is part of the exam. And because it often [presents prior to the onser of puberty, a pediatrician or peds endocrinology is appropriate, not ob-gyn.The other docs commenting have , unfortunately, not as much peds experience.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
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Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Consult doctor
Polycystic ovary is usually associated with increased secretion of androgenic hormones.
The results from hormone assays are not easy to interpret and it would be useful to consult your doctor, an ob/gyn specialist.

In brief: Consult doctor
Polycystic ovary is usually associated with increased secretion of androgenic hormones.
The results from hormone assays are not easy to interpret and it would be useful to consult your doctor, an ob/gyn specialist.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
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