Allergic reaction (possible anaphylaxis) after allergy testing, what to do?

Allergy testing. Only physicians trained in the specialty of allergy, asthma ; immunology are trained in a monitored situation during residency to perform skin testing for ige-mediated allergy. Some ENT programs are adding this to their training. If you were skin tested by a non-specialist, consult a specialist, if you were skin tested by an allergist, it is likely that you are unusally allergic.

Related Questions

All the allergy tests I took (food, dust, pollen, nuts) was 100 % negative. I'm afraid of anaphylaxis. No history of allergies in my family. Phobia?

It sounds like it. If there is not logical reason to be concerned about anaphylaxis, it sounds like your fear is psychologically based. In addition to support through medication for your psychological conditions, it would be good to seek out counseling to further understand your fear and reduce it. Hope this helps. Read more...
Reassurance Trap. There's no reassuring you here. A phobia is an intense, irrational fear. An obsession is an intrusive thought. See anxiety expert 4 careful diagnosis. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (cbt) -particularly the behavioral component involving exposure to the fear(s) (usually gradual)- is considered the most effective treatment. A clinical psychologist who specializes in phobias, anxiety, ocd can help. Read more...
Neg allergy tests. The negative tests are reassuring; anaphylaxis does not seem at all likely to happen. Trust the test results. Read more...