What is venous stasis?

Valves malfunction. Venous stasis is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning . This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. Deep system valve malfunction could be due to prior clots, superficial problems could lead to varicose veins and perforator malfunction could lead to venous ulcers.
Skin changes. Venous stasis is caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin. These veins enlarge, letting fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers. It is treated by laser ablation.
Venous stasis. The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs. This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction...

Related Questions

What is venous stasis; how does it occur?

Stagnant blood flow. Venous stasis exists when venous blood flow is diminished. Either by reduced venous return, diastolic dysfunction or by increased size of the vessels (varicose veins). Read more...
Vein pooling. Veins return blood to the heart. Venous stasis occurs when there is reduced flow or pooling in the veins, almost always occurring in the legs. The most common cause is when the one-way valves don't work well, leading to venous reflux, or back flow, with blood pooling in the veins. Other causes can be from damage caused by blood clots or other blockages. See a vein specialist/phlebologist. Read more...
Venous insufficiency. A better name for venous stasis is venous insufficiency. Stasis implies that blood isn't moving when, in fact, venous blood is moving--the wrong way. Normally venous valves direct blood flow up and out of the leg but when the valves stop working properly, blood flows backwards, pressure builds up and the pain and skin changes of "stasis" occur. More often than not, the cause is hereditary. Read more...
Valves malfunction. Venous stasis is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning . This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. Deep system valve malfunction could be due to prior clots, superficial problems could lead to varicose veins and perforator malfunction could lead to venous ulcers. Read more...
Venous stasis. The issue is one of vein hypertension, due to the impeded flow of blood returning to the heart, especially in the legs. This is due to incompetent valves in the veins. With increased blood pooling in the legs comes 'heavier' legs, swelling, pain from swelling, pitting in the skin, leakage of fluid and blood into the tissues, leakage of the fluid onto the skin causing maceration and destruction... Read more...
Skin changes. Venous stasis is caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin. These veins enlarge, letting fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers. It is treated by laser ablation. Read more...

I have what has been diagnosised venous stasis dermatitis for many years and have seen a number of dermatologist and have gotten only temporary relief?

No permanent cure. Stasis dermatitis is caused by sluggish blood flow in the veins of the legs due to breakdown of valves in those veins. There is no permanent cure as yet, although control is often possible. But going from doctor to doctor won't help. When you have an ongoing condition like this, pick a doctor you like and let him/her try various regimens until he/she finds the one that works best for you. Read more...
Vein Specialist. Most likely they are not treating the problem which is venous incompetence. There are some dermatologists that can treat the venous insufficiency but most do not. You will need to have an duplex ultrasound completed looking for chronic venous insufficiency. I would recommend that you see a physician that is board certified in phlebology. You will not get better until the cause is treated. Read more...
See a phlebologist. Evaluation including a duplex ultrasound study may show abnormal veins that can be ablated using one of several minimally invasive techniques. Read more...
Venous stasis. You need to be seen by a clinician who is interested in a non-surgical approach to your condition. The key to venous stasis is effective compression. Seek assistance from a large wound center that you can be comfortable with. Read more...

What can I do for venous stasis pain?

Compression. The best way to deal with pain and aching often associated with venous stasis is to prevent it! compression stocking are the mainstay of therapy. Most commonly knee high garments with at least 20-30 mmhg compression. Weight loss, leg elevation, and excercise all have important roles. People that have symptoms despite conservative therapy may need other interventions. See a vascular specialist! Read more...
Venous stasis pain. You need to have the pain evaluated to make sure that it is not due to any other health problems outside of the vein issue. Pain from vein comes from many different things. Ulcerations caused from disease can be painful; swelling from edema can be painful; the distention of the veins themselves can be painful. Compression is the mainstay treatment for venous disease. Seek help from a clinician. Read more...
Venous stasis pain. Lying down and putting your feet up higher than your heart helps. Compression is essential but you might need 30-40 mm hg stockings. The easiest way to do this is usually to wear prescription graduated compression stockings or circaids. If you can take anti-inflammatory medicine, that can help too. The best thing though is to see a vein specialist and treat your underlying venous insufficiency. Read more...

What can be done for venous stasis disease with lymphedema?

Valves malfunction. Venous stasis with lymphedema is due to venous insufficiency which is a result of the valves in the venous system malfunctioning . This can be due to the valves in the deep system, superficial system or connecting system. See a vein specialist for a full venous evaluation with a venous reflux exam. Initial treatment consists of support hose, lymphedema massage and compression pumps. Read more...