5 doctors weighed in:

Could skin tears turn into venous stasis ulcer?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Phlebology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Venous stasis is caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin.
These veins enlarge, letting fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers or inability to heal minor wounds.

In brief: Yes

Venous stasis is caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin.
These veins enlarge, letting fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers or inability to heal minor wounds.
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Thank
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care

In brief: Transformation

If you have underlying venous hypertension, the condition that causes venous stasis ulceration, then a skin tear could potentially not heal resulting in a non-healing wound due to underlying venous stasis.
Technically this would be a multifactorial reason for the wound not healing.

In brief: Transformation

If you have underlying venous hypertension, the condition that causes venous stasis ulceration, then a skin tear could potentially not heal resulting in a non-healing wound due to underlying venous stasis.
Technically this would be a multifactorial reason for the wound not healing.
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Thank
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