Bicuspid aortic valve, dilated aortic root, what to do?

Be established. Become established with a cardiologist - i follow many people with your condition. When the time is right - usually at an older age, the valve can be replaced with or without the aortic root, depending on their condition at the time.

Related Questions

Bicuspid aortic valve, aortic root dilated at 4.6cm, no stenosis, trivial regurg, cardiologist not worried at all, I'm really anxious, should I be?

No. Keep monitoring the aorta and the valve. Make sure you are on appropriate medication such as ace inhibitors. Read more...
Aortic balve. Needs to be closely monitored not yet requiring intervention based on your description. Read more...
No you shouldn't. Dear themalteser, bicuspid aortic valve is very common, affecting 1 to 2% of the general population. In fact, it is the most common congenital heart defect. Most people who have a bucspid aortic valve have a well functioning valve - like you do. The only recommendation is to continue to have follow up visits with your cardiologist and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Read more...
Needs to be followed. Nearly 100% of bicuspid valves will need to be replaced eventually. Currently it seems the valve is ok with no stenosis or regurgitation. The aortic root dilation is more significant. The surgical threshold for this starts at 5cm with most having surgery by 5.5cm. If you have not had a ct scan yet you should. If this is your first it should be repeated in 6 months. Read more...

What is surgery like for bicuspid aortic valve disease?

Valve Replacement. If you have a bicuspid aortic valve (normally there are 3 leaflets, but in this case 2 are fused together from birth) the valve often develops either leakiness/ regurgitation or stiffness / stenosis. The treatment is open heart surgery with valve replacement. This could be either a tissue valve or a mechanical valve. Check with your doctor for advice. Read more...