Related Questions

Does the dr having the malady himself e.G. Spinal stenosis make the doctor less objective?

See below. I should think the contrary would be true. If a doc has same medical condition u do, can offer insight into condition without losing professional objectivity. Read more...
Its like having. a fellow patient to rely on for info and how to manage the disease. So more objective. That said, each of us experiences pain differently, so what one person gets relief from may be different in another person. What I get from this is more info that can help from someone dealing with the same thing as you. Read more...
No. If anything, it likely making them better by being able to identify with the patient. Spinal stenosis is a common problem and the treatment options are well established. Check out Spine-health.com. Read more...

Are there tests to confirm the doctor's diagnosis of back spinal stenosis?

Mri. Radiologist reading of a MRI is an objective second opinion without conflicts of interest dont get operated on by some one you dont trust see a spine specialist . Mild stenosis should be treated nonoperatively at first severe stenosis may need surgery if it matches clincally to symptoms and exam the diagnosis of stenosis should be made off MRI otherwise it is a working suspected diagnosis. Read more...
Yes. Yes typically an MRI, ct scan, or a myelogram are the tests that confirm the presence of the spinal stenosis and show the severity of it. Read more...

2 level adr in2010. Having mild myelopathy. Mri shows severe spinal stenosis c3-4. Doc. Suggests conversion to fusion c3-c8 posterior. How's this done?

Cervical stenosis . Narrowing of the cervical spine or spinal stenosis is often caused by a combination of congenital narrowing with progressive arthritis or spondylosis. In general, the operation to relieve the stenosis can be performed from the front (anterior) or the back (posterior) of the neck. Sometimes in combination. The approach is dictated by the predominant area of narrowing and prior surgery. Read more...
Back of neck. Given your prior surgery from the front of your neck, the approach from the back will avoid the scarring associated with the prior surgery. The surgery will require an incision and the muscles will be separated to expose the bones covering back of the spine. The bone will be removed to take pressure off the spinal cord. How much bone removed is determined by the narrowed levels where pressure is. Read more...

Please help. We don't know what to to do. My father in law has severe ddd and spinal stenosis. Almost everyday he is havibg seizures and is partially paralysed. He is afraid of having a spinal fusion because his doctor told him it might not last. What sh

Degenerative . Degenerative disk disease is wearing out of the disks which usually occurs from aging or injury. Spinal stenosis is the closing up of the spinal canal and pinching the nerves going to the legs from thickening of the spinal ligaments, facet joints and bone spurs. Patients can have both of these problems without spinal instability requiring fusion surgery. Most people have an option of simple decompression through traditional laminectomy or minimal invasive metrx (tubular) decompression. There will soon be available an extremely minimally invasive endoscopic decompression surgery for spinal stenosis. Fusion surgery is mainly required when there is slippage of the spine, that is a spondylolithesis. Often even when there is minor slippage, if it does not move with flexion-extension x-rays (x-rays done bending forward and then backward) then decompression can usually be done without fusion. If this approach is taken i would recommend minimally invasive spinal decompression to minimize injury and surgical weaking to bones, muscles and ligaments. Occasionally the slipping will increase over time after decompression surgery requiring a delayed fusion surgery. As you can see there are many options for treatment of your father's problem. Your father may benefit from a second opinion from a surgeon who does minimally invasive spine surgery. Good luck! for more information please see my health guides on spinal athritis, spinal stenosis and spondylolithesis! Read more...
This . This deosn't sound like a simple matter. If he is having epileptic seizures, this should be dealt with first as soon as possible by a neurologist. The neurologist may also be able to advise regarding the need for the spinal surgery. If his paralysis is a result of his spinal problem, the risk benefit ratio for surgery sounds like it is highly in favor of surgery. Spinal stenosis surgery can be very straight foreward and doesn't always require a fusion. It is always adviseable to get opinions from more than one surgeon. Read more...