Related Questions

Tinnitus (constant and loud) in left ear/head, no hearing loss (test done), throat congestion, no nasal congestion, little hypersensitivity, from 18days?

LPR. Laryngopharyngeal edema (lpr) is a form of acid reflux that is often 'silent', meaning that heart burn is absent. If tiny amounts of acids make it high into the back of your throat, a dry cough, hoarseness, shortness of breath or ear fullness from eustachian tube irritation can develop. Treatment is to discontinue caffeine and alcohol, no late meals and otc-ppi such as Omeprazole before meals. Read more...

I went to dr. They said I have nasal congestion. Gave me sudogest. I've had it for 12days now. With my left ear plugged. I'm very annoyed please help?

Middle ear effusion. It sounds like you might have fluid in the middle ear. A cold or allergies can cause the eustachian tube to swell, impairing drainage from the middle ear. This can lead to congestion or fluid(effusion) in the middle ear. This causes reduced hearing or blockage. Decongestants, nasal steroids, oral steroids, and Guaifenesin can be used to reduce congestion or drain fluid. See an otolaryngologist . Read more...

Pulsating, whooshing sound & fullness in left ear ~1 wk. Intensifies upon standing or moving quickly. Chest/nasal congestion ~6.5 wks. Suggestions?

See ENT. You need to consult your PCP and an ENT now. The former for both nasal and chest , the latter for the ear. On the other hand, it is possible that the nasal congestion may be the cause for the ear problem. Read more...

Subjective tinnitus (continuous, left ear/head), hearing test (no loss), throat congestion, no nasal congestion, from 20days. If tinnitus will ever go?

Tinnitus. The most common cause of persistent tinnitus is hearing lost, but other conditions such as TMJ disorder, head or neck injury can also cause tinnitus. Tinnitus associated with loud noise exposure may resolve. Read more...

I have had a lot of head/ nasal congestion for a week. Now everytime I bite down I hear a balloon or drum tapping sound. Why? What should I take?

Fluid in ear. Those symptoms suggest you have fluid in the ear or sinuses or both. It's a common complication of a cold. If you're otherwise healthy and not having high fevers, you can try over-the-counter decongestants for a few days to see if it clears. If not, it's sometimes helped with antibiotics. I'd seek help right away, though, if you get a fever over 100, or you have loss of hearing. Read more...