5 doctors weighed in:

Tooth sensitive to cold, sweets, pressure. Is that a cavity?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Tooth decay

You have reported symptoms of cavities.
The only way to know what is actually the problem is by seeing a dentist. You definitely have something going on that needs attention and treatment, remember tooth decay will not go away without treatment. It will keep on progressing, getting bigger and deeper until it is treated. The sooner the better, easier and less costly treatment.

In brief: Tooth decay

You have reported symptoms of cavities.
The only way to know what is actually the problem is by seeing a dentist. You definitely have something going on that needs attention and treatment, remember tooth decay will not go away without treatment. It will keep on progressing, getting bigger and deeper until it is treated. The sooner the better, easier and less costly treatment.
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Possibly

There are many causes for sensitive teeth.
See your dentist to determine the cause of the sensitivity.

In brief: Possibly

There are many causes for sensitive teeth.
See your dentist to determine the cause of the sensitivity.
Dr. Justin Zumstein
Dr. Justin Zumstein
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Dr. STEPHEN PERRY
Dentistry

In brief: Very likely

Those symptoms are in fact characteristic of a advanced decay resulting in inflammation of the central tissue of the tooth from bacterial invasion to the tubules ahead of the open cavity.
The pressure sensitivity when biting suggest that central tissue inflammation has spread to the ligament that holds the tooth in the bone. Please see a dentist quickly and get a pulp vitality test and x-ray.

In brief: Very likely

Those symptoms are in fact characteristic of a advanced decay resulting in inflammation of the central tissue of the tooth from bacterial invasion to the tubules ahead of the open cavity.
The pressure sensitivity when biting suggest that central tissue inflammation has spread to the ligament that holds the tooth in the bone. Please see a dentist quickly and get a pulp vitality test and x-ray.
Dr. STEPHEN PERRY
Dr. STEPHEN PERRY
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