Have symptoms of MS (blurry vision, pain, fatigue, muscle weakness) but have normal evoked potentials. Brain MRI w/ white matter changes? Still be ms?

Recommend: Your symptoms are nonspecific and could be due to many conditions. Mri lesions could be due to migraine or prior head injuries, and your doctor could describe whether the pattern is consistent with a specific cause. I no longer use evoked potentials to confirm ms, and rarely use for any reason. If things seem unclear, a lumbar puncture may be useful. Discuss all of this with neurologist.

Related Questions

I was told I have ms, but I have a lot of pain, can that happen after several mris, and lab work I was told I have several markers for ms, ie: blurry vision, dizzy, increasing muscle weakness, mental confusion, MRI showed nerve white matter under attack,

Multiple . Multiple sclerosis is a complex syndrome caused by imbalance in the body's own immune system that leads it to attack something called myelin, a substance that insulates nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. These attacks leave temporary and permanent scars on the brain and spinal cord that can be seen on mri. Symptoms include loss of vision, or loss of feeling or strength in a limb, that may appear and disappear, only to show up in a different spot later on. Spasticity, a condition resulting from poor control of muscle contraction and relaxation, can cause muscle pain, and usually occurs later in the course of the condition. Multiple sclerosis is often thought of as a condition that mostly affects young, white women, but this is a stereotype; men, non-whites, and older people are also affected. Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is done according to an international standard known as the (revised) mcdonald criteria. These criteria are based on clinical findings, MRI findings, lumbar puncture (spinal tap) findings, and special testing (like evoked potentials). There are also a number of other conditions that can resemble multiple sclerosis symptoms, MRI appearance, and laboratory findings, that may require additional testing to exclude. The less "typical" the presentation, the more important it is to confirm the diagnosis. It is never wrong to consider getting a second opinion. More information about multiple sclerosis can be found at the website of the national multiple sclerosis society http://www.Nationalmssociety.Org/. Read more...
Pain and MS. People with MS can experience pain symptoms directly related to their disease, or from muscle spasm/tightness, or to orthopedic problems related to weakness. Pain is not normally a hallmark of MS, many people with MS have no pain. Perhaps it is time to have a face to face visit with the doctor and review your treatment options. Read more...

Symptoms of MS, brain MRI showed "no significant abnormalities in the white matter" symptoms came back 6 weeks later. Next step is neurologist,?

Yes. There are times when there is no substitute for the expertise and acumen of an experienced, astute neurological diagnostician. Read more...
Symptoms undiagnosed. It is good news that the MRI looked normal. That pretty much rules out MS. It can be helpful to visit with a neurologist though, since the symptoms returned. They handle symptoms like those that occur in MS and other kinds of conditions. Read more...
Confirmation. "symptoms of MS" can occur in many conditions, and are neither diagnostic or definitive. Although the brain MRI is reassuring, your neurological symptoms should be assessed by a neurologist. A primary care doctor does have limitations, and that is why specialists can be useful. Read more...

I have some facial muscle weakness. Brain MRI about a year ago showed nothing. Was told it was anxiety. Could that be the only cause? I fear als.

Doubt ALS. Weak facial muscles are associated with a few hereditary muscle diseases (e.g., fsh), but can be due to problems with cranial nerves, such as facial or trigeminal, and problems outside cranial cavity may not be seen on standard brain mri. Very unlikely that you have als, but if you need more information, a facial nerve EMG might be of some value. Read more...

Brain MRI findings. Tiny nonspecific periventricular and subcortical white matter. Possiblities mini strokes, vasculaties, ms. I shuffle my feet & drop?

Not common. If you are 41 as it says, you should be evaluated by a neurologist for your symptoms and MRI findings--they are more common in older adults. Read more...
Many thots. You do need a thorough evaluation, as several problems may be present. Certainly, wonder about multiple sclerosis, (check for spinal cord lesions), cadasil, arteritis(lupus), lyme disease, sjogren's, even vitamin deficiencies. Might get information from spinal tap. Read more...
Nonspecific finding. White matter changes that are nonspecific are sometimes over reported or under-reported on MRI studies. They may be misread and really suggest MS, they may be a finding with no clinical relevance. Usually it is the latter. It sounds like the brain MRI did not help that much. So you shuffle your feet and drop? What do you mean by drop? Do you have numbness? Why was the brain MRI done? Read more...