Help doctors! What're the types of skin cancer?

Usually 3 major. Basal cell ca, squamous cell ca, and malignant melanoma are the main types of skin cancer. Bcc is usually locally damaging slow to spread; scc is more invasive and may spread via lymph vessels to nodes; mm is very invasive, and may rapidly spread via lymph ; small blood vessels.

Related Questions

Do doctors know of different types of skin cancer?

SKin Cancer. The most common type of skin cancer are basal cell, squamous and malignant melanoma. Always have a dermatologist or plastic surgeon examine any skin lesion which you have concerns about, is growing or changing. The following abcde rule of melanoma helps classify suspicious skin lesions. Asymmetry borders (irregular) color (variegated) diameter (greater than 6 mm (0.24 in), about the size of a. Read more...
Yes. The three main skin cancers are basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma. Fortunately the least dangerous is the most common....Basal cell cancer. :). Read more...
Yes . Skin cancers can be divided into melanoma and non-melanoma. The non melanoma skin cancers (nmsc) commonly include basal cell & squamous cell carcinomas. Other rare nmsc include merkel cell. Extramammary paget's disease, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, mycosis fungoides to name a few. You can visit http://skincancer.Org for trusted information. Hope this helps. Read more...

Dear doctors, my husband has been diagnosed with nonmelanoma skin cancer, what are the chances of us getting a healthy baby? Thank you.

Skin Cancer & baby. The nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell or squamous cell will have no effect on you having a healthy baby. In other words there is no relationship. Read more...
Very very good. If it is not a melanoma, other two skin cancers 1) basal cell carcinoma locally invasive only will not spread, if treated 2) squamous cell carcinoma if excised early before it spreads will have excellent cure, need regular follow up for skin cancers by your doctor. Do not worry. Read more...
Normal. I would not think this diagnosis would affect your chances of having a healthy baby. Read more...

Why do doctors choose to do surgery when there is a proven skin cancer cure known as curaderm-bec5?

Beware. Anytime you see "proven cure" attached to a product, you should be suspicious. Curaderm bec5 is an extract of eggplant, and there is no credible evidence that eggplant is an effective treatment for skin cancer, no matter what you've read on the internet. Not only that, but using these "magical" creams only delays effective treatment (such as surgery), once you realize that you've been had. Read more...
What proof? A quote from the archives of dermatology: "escharotic agents are available as herbal supplements and are being used by patients for the treatment of skin cancer. The efficacy of these agents is unproven and their content is unregulated. Serious consequences may result from their use. ...Physicians should recommend against the use of escharotic agents for skin cancer". Read more...
It is a scam. The "scientific" publications you have read have not be published in the actual medical literature. If you have had "amazing results", I am happy for you. However, i could never, ever, recommend this type therapy to a cancer patient without proven data that it might help. Unfortunately, all it will do for a patient is make them poorer. Read more...
Not proven. There is no "proven" skin cancer cure aside from surgery. Curaderm is an escharotic agent that is widely regarded as a scam, and has been around for decades. Most testimonials you read, people are reporting treating multiple different cancers, basal cells and squamous cells, all over themselves; to have that many different primary cancers would be rare and likely just self(and wrong) diagnosis. Read more...

How would I be able to tell it is skin cancer aside from going to the doctor, is there any home self test or something?

Look in the mirror. Examine your skin regularly. Look for spots which are changing in size or color. Also look for spots bleeding or ulcerating. If you see any, make sure to get them checked out. If you have a strong family history of skin cancer, see a dermatologist early. Lesions are suspicious for melanoma if they have (abcd): a-asymmtry, b-irregular borders, c-different colors, d-diameter >6mm. Best wishes. Read more...
A few clues. There a different types of skin cancers some are easy to diagnose by their clinical appearance, others require a trained eye (dermatologist). Regardless, all need a biopsy to make the diagnosis. I recommend that you go to the skin cancer foundation website (www.Skincancer.Org) to learn more. The website is a trusted resource with photos & helpful info. If you are concerned see a dermatologist! Read more...
The Ugly Duckling. Interestingly, the "ugly duckling phenomenon" is very helpful in identifying potentially dangerous lesions. Essentially, if one lesion looks oddly different than the others it should be taken into more close consideration. Read more...
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body. Read more...

After last summer few of my bithmarks have changed shapes/size a bit. How big difference shall be to suspect skin cancer or to contact a doctor?

Changing moles. There isn't one specific answer. If the spots are getting larger or darker then you should get them checked out. Most cancers arise from a pre existing mole. Better safe than sorry! Read more...
Measure the birthmark diameter. It is important to measure the birthmarks you have and to see if they become enlarged, regular, or multiple colors. A birthmark greater than 6 mm is suspicious especially if the contours are a regular if you measure these and follow them and they increase in size it is best to have these evaluated by your family practitioner or dermatologist. Read more...
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body. Read more...

Does any doctor here know about skin cancer called cycoma? What can you tell me?

Skin cytoma. The lesion being referred to is a skin cytoma or histiocytoma. It is one of the most common benign soft tissue tumors of the skin. Its histologic appearance is responsible for the array of different names used. These tumors have a predominantly dermal location, composed of a mixture of fibroblastic, myofibroblastic-like, and histiocytic cells. The malignant variant is the MFH. Read more...

If the doctor says you have sun damage on your face. Does that mean it is skin cancer?

No. Not at all ...It probably means you need to more careful when you're in the sun to prevent risk for developing skin cancer. Read more...
No. All it means is it has sun damage. Such skin is at risk of developing cancer in the future. Read more...
Not necessarily. Sun damage can take the form of dyschromias (pigment changes), wrinkles, actinic keratosis, etc. One could lump skin cancer in with sun damage, but probably not. To a trained eye, it is easy to tell who has spent too much time in the sun without enough protection. Some "sun damage" could be precancerous, so make sure to have appropriate follow up if your doctor recommends it. Read more...

I live in Phoenix. Someone (not a doctor) told me that everyone here will get skin cancer eventually. Is that really true? I don't buy it.

Me neither. Your risks are higher for sure. It is a preventable condition and many people act appropriately to prevent it. I've got family in Phoenix. No one has ever developed skin cancer. But they protect themselves, shade, sunscreen, protective clothing. . Read more...
Not true. Not everyone will get skin cancer. Even some people who don't follow any of the rules don't get cancer. Just like some smokers never get cancer. However, to minimize your risk use sunscreen, wear a hat, avoid the sun during the peak hours of 10 am to 2 pm. Avoid tanning beds. Don't get sunburned to get the basis of a "good tan." Certainly some people are at greater risk than others. Read more...