How do degenerative osteoarthritis/degenerative joint disease/degenerative disc disease differ?

Arthritis vrs aging. Degenerative joint disease is an outdated term for osteoarthritis of peripheral joints. Degenerative disc disease is sometimes diagnosed when vertebral spurs are noted. The latter phenomenon, referred to most accurately as spondylosis deformans, is asymptomatic. It may be associated with disc disease, but disc damage does not necessarily cause pain.

Related Questions

What are some things I can do to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease in my neck?

Therapy, medications. Initial treatments for ddd and osteoarthritis of the neck include physical therapy, massage, medications. Some try acupuncture or chiropractic manipulation. If symptoms are more severe, consider pain management for stronger medications. Sometimes, despite all these treatments, symptoms are still there. Consider an evaluation by a spine surgeon to discuss surgery. Read more...
Therapy. The best long term treatment for neck pain from degenerative changes is strengthening and stretching exercise. Stretching will help maintain motion and strengthening the muscles will provide support for the worn joints and help delay progression. The best way to get into a routine is to work with a physical therapist a few times then transition to an independent exercise program. Read more...

Can a radionuclide bone scan miss degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis and osteopenia?

Yes. The bone scan shows areas of active bone deposition as "hot". Osteopenia won't be diagnosed as this denotes loss of bone density. Degenerative disc disease and osteoarthritis may not be demonstrated if they are insufficient to cause a bone response (healing or what is medically called an osteoblastic response). Read more...

22 year-old woman is 59" and 85 pounds, found to have osteoporosis, and despite not having any eating problems, cannot gain weight to get back.....?

Osteoporosis. Your weight is ideal but not osteoporosis, have yourself examined for any other secondary reason for osteoporosis and get it treated. Read more...
Perhaps a combination of issues. I agree that one has to be concerned about malabsorption. With what is going on metabolically it wouldn't be surprising to have some anxiety and a touch of hyperventilation syndrome. At some point one must wonder about endocrine abnormalities. While thyroid issues could explain some of her signs and symptoms I would extend out the endocrine evaluation particularly if no extra fat found in the stool. Read more...
Adrenal Insufficiency. Did this patient start with the low bone density & are we actually seeing improvement from worse dz prior to dx. The vitamin D def could be the cause & should be treated with high-dose vitamin D as the pt describes, however she does not say what her vitamin D level is now - a goal should be approximately 60. What is the calcium level? Regardless she should have a parathyroid hormone level done in order r/o secondary &/or possibly tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Tx w Forteo should be considered given the pt's age & severity of the dz. Celiac dx is a definite concern & at least the blood tests should be done & if + there is a dx.. The pt describes wt loss & episodes of tachycardia, as well as severe fatigue. These are some of the most common findings in chronic adrenal insufficiency, which is often overlooked because the symptoms are so vague & fit so many other diseases as well. This at least warrants consideration & a work up. I would recommend this be done before any procedures. Read more...
Dyspnea is the clue. my question is whether you have osteoporosis or osteopenia, two very different concepts. If you are taking large doses of vitamin D, calcium will be pumped into your soft tissues without supplementary vitamin K. Dyspnea is the fancy word for breathlessness and is a strong indication of energy balance, particularly in the lower brain. I would give you intravenous water-soluble vitamins. Find a physician who specializes in Alternative Medicine. If this is psychological I am a "Dutch uncle" Read more...
You may have an- -eating "disorder" , but not the usual type. Your diet may B deficient in the type of calories U costume. I would B AVN by an endocrinologist initially, 2 C if U have deficiencies in vitamin or other reabsorption problems. Also status of thyroid. U may very well need a special diet. Another is regular exercise 2 build muscle.people with higher BMI R able 2 survive a serious illness better than U. Read more...
Celiac disease? You mention referral to a gastroenterologist but there are no celiac antibody test (endomysial antibody, tissue transglutaminase, immunoglobulin A,G) results. Celiac disease with malabsorption must be excluded. If unsure a small bowel biopsy is indicated. Read more...
? Addison's. More history is needed regarding earlier childhood. Over 1/3 of bone growth and calcium deposition occurs during puberty, and it is difficult to increase bone density after age 20. What was calcium and Vit D intake during puberty? Slim girls that exercise a lot often have infrequent menses and low estrogen, also known to cause osteoporosis as is seen in anorexia. Giving Ca and Vit D now slows futher loss but doesn't build more new bone. Teriparatide is the only osteoporosis medication that has the potential to rebuild bone and actually reverse osteoporosis, at least somewhat. Others just slow continued loss. Also, low potassium (although level was 3.7 in 2015) and marked fatique is consistent with Addison's which can also contribute to osteoporosis. Has this been evaluated by endocrinologoist? Read more...
Possible underlying mitochondrial disease. The hallmark of mitochondrial disease is unexplained multisystem dysfunction, The autonomic nervous system is frequently affected--in your case episodes of frequent tachycardia following exertion. As mitochondrial function declines, the individual may experience declining ability to have sufficient energy to get through the day. Muscle and joint pain can be severe. I have observed difficulty to elevate low vitamin D levels in many affected patients. You may require high daily doses to maintain a normal level--5000 to 10,000 iu/day. Gastrointestinal symptoms may lead to to gastroparesis and malabsorption with such severity as requiring TPN to survive. You may find that mitt-functional supplements may be very helpful--they are substances necessary for production of energy, particularly L-carnitine, as well as antioxidants to protect mitochondria from the free radicals produced in energy production. Evaluation at a University with mitochondrial expertise is indicated. Read more...

Is degenerative joint disease the same thing as osteoarthritis?

Yes. Arthritis or degenerative joint disease are generic catch all terms applied to all conditions affecting the cartilage inside a joint. There are over a hundred different types of arthritis. Read more...
No. The two should not be used synonymously. While DJD is frequently seen as a radiographic abnormality in aging joints, oa also manifests inflammatory joint damage. Read more...

What are differences between osteoarthritis and degenerative joint disease?

DJD Osteoarthritis. Djd and osteoarthritis are the same. They are both degenerative changes in a joint. It is just that some people favor one over the other. Read more...