7 doctors weighed in:

Are streptococcal infections higher in under-developed countries?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andrew Carroll
Family Medicine
5 doctors agree

In brief: Ubiquitous

Strep is ubiquitous, meaning it's everywhere.
In famine countries, infections in general are more prevalent because the people, in their poor state of health, are more susceptible to infections. This does not mean you're more likely to contract an illness. Wash your hands, boil your water, and keep wounds clean.

In brief: Ubiquitous

Strep is ubiquitous, meaning it's everywhere.
In famine countries, infections in general are more prevalent because the people, in their poor state of health, are more susceptible to infections. This does not mean you're more likely to contract an illness. Wash your hands, boil your water, and keep wounds clean.
Dr. Andrew Carroll
Dr. Andrew Carroll
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In brief: Unknown

Neonatal group b streptococcal disease.
Rates in the developing world remain largely uncharacterized because, in many settings, causes of illness and death early in life go undiagnosed. A recent multinational study of vaginal gbs carriage rates among pregnant women in several developing countries, the United States, and europe found high variability in carriage rates, ranging from 7% to 22%.

In brief: Unknown

Neonatal group b streptococcal disease.
Rates in the developing world remain largely uncharacterized because, in many settings, causes of illness and death early in life go undiagnosed. A recent multinational study of vaginal gbs carriage rates among pregnant women in several developing countries, the United States, and europe found high variability in carriage rates, ranging from 7% to 22%.
Dr. Ecaterina Sartina
Dr. Ecaterina Sartina
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