What is a successful cure of hemophilia (factor viii deficiency).?

None. Hemophilia is treated with recombinant factor viii, however, it is not a cure.
None currently. For hemophilia b, however, there are very encouraging results using gene therapy in humans. Hemophilia a (factor viii deficiency) is harder to treat by current gene therapy methods because the gene is huge. There are some gene editing techniques that have shown promise in mouse models. Hopefully soon some of these will make it to clinical trials in humans.

Related Questions

Can you tell me if someone is heterozygous w/ the hemophilia gene, is it possible for them to still have factor viii deficiency?

Yes, in men. Hemophilia is a sex linked disorder and men develop the disease when there only x chromosome has the defective gene. See this site for more info. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000538.htm. Read more...
Yes. By definition, women are the only people who can be heterozygous for x-linked genes. 10% of women who are carriers for hemophilia can also be symptomatic because of a phenomenon known as x-chromosome inactivation. Factor levels in these people can be reduced low enough that they have symptoms (though not as bad a severely affected males). Read more...

What to do along with Factor VIII for severe hemarthrosis along with large joint effusion of knee in patient with Hemophilia A?

Xfusion with factor- -Vlll, then aspiration of the joint. Chronic hemarthrosis destroys the articular cartilages. It consumes O2, & does not allow it 2 B nourished. Cartilages only O2 comes from the joint fluid, but it's not available since the inflammatory reaction 2 the blood consumes it. Read more...

What are the tests for factor viii deficiency?

Blood tests and. Family history. Blood tests for levels of factor viii are available, though simpler tests, e.g., PTT with appropriate family history may be sufficient. Read more...

What sort of disorder is factor viii deficiency?

Hemophilia. Factor viii deficiency is classical hemophilia that affected royal families of europe. It leads bleeding in tissue, especially in joints. It is an x-linked disease and manifests essentially only in men, women are carriers. Read more...
Hemophilia. It is a fairly common form of a hereditary blood disorder called hemophilia. Most cases are mild and only need factor replacement with major injuries. Others are more severe. There are recombinant factors available for replacement. Read more...
R/o vWD. A patient with von willebrand's disease, which is extremely common and usually mild, may be told they have factor viii deficiency. Read more...

What are the symptoms of factor viii deficiency?

Bleeding. Factor viii is one of the coagulation factors and its deficiency is the cause of hemophilia a. Depending on the severity of deficiency, there may be no symptoms, bleeding from cuts and excessive bruising with minor trauma, bleeding into joints, excessive bleeding due to surgery, including circumcision. Read more...
Bleeding/bruising. Factor viii deficiency or hemophilia- is a bleeding disorder. It is hereditary in most cases . The symptoms would be spontaneous bleeding- either in the joints, skin/gum, or other places etc or prolonged bleeding. The severity of bleeding will depend on how low the level of the factor viii is.. Usually the bleeding episodes will manifest at early age. Discuss further with your hematologist. Read more...

What is the prognosis for a person suffering from severe hemophilia, but getting regular factor viii replacement therapy?

Excellent. One of my new colleagues has almost no factor viii but leads a near-normal life (no boxing or tackle football) on replacement. We can be thankful for biotechnology that has made this possible. Read more...

What is the treatment for factor viii deficiency?

Factor VIII. Concentrate. Factor viii is prepared by recombinant technology, though it may also be extracted from human plasma. Depending on the severity of deficiency, factor viii may be given prophylactically or to treat episodes of bleeding. The drug is given intravenously. Read more...