How long is the recovery of lumbar spine fusion?

Physical therapy. After a lumbar spine fusion with instrumentation, most patients are mobilized within a day or two. They progress with physical therapy. The incisions are usually healed within a week. Ultimately, the fusion needs to become solid. This may take about 3 months. During that time physical therapy is key in getting the patient moving and overcoming the pain from surgery which can be significant.

Related Questions

I had a t2-l1 posterior spinal fusion 5 years ago. I having been experiencing pain in my cervical and lumbar spine. Is this due to degeneration?

T2-L1? That would be a very large fusion. But if it were t12-l1, then, yes you may develop pain in other areas of the spine. The fused area is stiff and neighboring areas have to work a little harder. Read more...
Possibly. At your age, the reason why you had the spinal fusion is important as degenerative disease is uncommon without underlying trauma or other arthropathy. Pain in the lumbar region that is due to muscle spasm can transmit/radiate to neck and neck pain can transmit/radiate to the lower back. Need to discuss the discomfort with your physician. Read more...

6 weeks post-op 2 level lumbar spine fusion + laminectomy. Sciatic pain gone-healing on sched. Why the intrmittnt sunburn-like pain on skin of thighs?

LfC nerve irritation. Rom brace or or positioning lateral femoral cutaneous nerve watch pressure in front points of pelvis by brace congratulations in resolution of target preop symptoms or inflammation of near by L4 nerve roots should resolve with some more time. Read more...
Nerve healing. A decompression and sometimes let the nerves heal and cause a hypersensitivity. Also, increased activity and make this sensation from the skin and muscle use. Time is the solution with increasing your activity of walking over the next month. Read more...

Am I too young for spinal fusion? I'm a 18 yo female I had a laminectomy last year in my lumbar spine l3-s1 to decompress my nerves. Its been a year and im still in excruciating chronic pain my surgeon said I need a spinal fusion but he wont do it cause im

I'm . I'm sorry to hear you are having these symptoms. After a multi-level laminectomy it is possible that you have developed spinal instability in the lumbar spine and if this is the case a fusion is one option, but not the only option. I treat conditions such as yours on a regular basis and would be happy to examine you and review your imaging studies in order to discuss your condition and what options are available. Generally a spinal fusion is reserved for instability or spinal deformity. Special tests can be ordered to determine if this is the best approach, or if a more conservative approach is appropriate. Age in of itself is not an indication or contra-indication for fusion, however, taking into account that you are 18, it is imperative that the proper work up is implemented prior to moving forward with any type of fusion procedure. Dr. Gleiber. Read more...
Yes you are young. But discuss this with your surgeon. It may be the only option to stop your pain. Read more...

I am scheduled to have a ct-myelogram w/contrast. I had a reaction to the contrast material previously. I had a prior reaction. I have a charite artificial disc in my lumbar spine. I have a spinal fusion above and below the disc. L3-l4 are fused with the

"Contrast" . "contrast" is a preparation that is used in medical imaging to increase the visual difference between similar or adjacent tissues. Contrast can be as simple as frothy salt solution, which is useful in some ultrasound studies, or much more complex, such as the gadolinium-containing molecules used for contrast in MRI studies. Ct contrast contains iodine, an element whose properties block x-rays that are used in the ct scanner. Common benign responses to iodine-containing contrast includes flushing (a pretty noticeable sense of warmth) and a metallic taste in the mouth. More profound responses include itching, hives, and swelling in the throat. These are called "anaphylactoid" reactions. The risk of anaphylactoid reactions can be reduced with medications like Diphenhydramine and corticosteroids. These sorts of reactions are common enough that radiologists and radiology technicians can spot them quickly, and all ct scanning suites are equipped to deal with them. Seafood and topical iodine allergies are not predictors of who will develop an anaphylactoid reaction to ct contrast (although this is a widely-held erroneous belief). Another response to ct contrast is kidney injury. The risk of kidney injury might be reduced by things including avoiding certain medications and keeping well-hydrated prior to the procedure. Concerns regarding reactions to ct contrast are valid, and should be addressed with the physician who orders the test as well as the physician who is responsible for performing the test. Read more...