Hello docs, is chiari malformation genetic?

Not know for sure. Information on genetics being investigated.Duke University Medical Center is investigating the hereditary basis of Chiari type I malformations with or without syringomyelia The research is aimed at learning if caused by inheritance factors.

Related Questions

Is there a genetic test to catch an arnold chiari malformation early?

Not yet. Arnold chiari malformation can occur by itself or in association with other congenital abnormalities. There is no specific genetic test for arnold chiari yet. Read more...
AFP? The arnold chiari malformation is associated with spina bifida. In some pregnant women there can be elevation of the AFP that suggests such a risk. A high resolution ultrasound of the fetus can look for a spinal closure defect. Amniocentesis is more accurate but much more risky. Certain medications raise the risk of spina bifida - especially depakote. Use folate (folic acid) and get quality ultrasounds. Read more...

If I have an arnold chiari malformation, should I get genetic testing to check for other things?

Perhaps. If you have other birth defects (chiari can be secondary to spina bifida or be a part of syndromes), then chromosome testing may be indicated. Many chiari malformations occur alone, in which case genetic testing is not necessary. As genome sequencing becomes more rapid and available, genes conferring susceptibility to chiari and other isolated birth defects may become available for testing. Read more...
Probably not. The arnold chiari malformation is associated with spina bifida and brain malformations. These are either obvious on exam or not present. Genetic testing does not help. Bowel and bladder dysfunction is common as is scoliosis and hip problems. These should be part of usual and appropriate evaluation. Complications with hydrocephalus and risk for seizures should also be checked out. Read more...

Is it possible to have "slightly low lying cerebellar tonsils" without it being chiari malformation? That was a finding on MRI but doc says no chiari

Yes, I suppose so. Chiari malformations have specific findings. "Slightly low lying cerebellar tonsils" is a somewhat nebulous, nonspecific subjective description. It probably means that the tonsillar tip is below the foramen magnum but within the range of normal variation, but if you are concerned, talk to your doc about it. Read more...

Is a CT scanner good enough to spot a TIA in the cerebellum or brain stem area. 2 vertigo attacks recently have prompted er docs to check for Tia. Have history of chiari malformation.?

Better to use MRI. MRI may give a more detailed picture Also have a consultation with neurologist or neurosurgeon to determine if the chiari malformation may be the cause. Read more...
Not really. the CT is known to be limited in its ability to image the cerebellum and brain stem. The bones at the base of the skull produce an artifact that can obscure pathology. MRI is better suited to image the posterior fossa and brainstem . Read more...
My views. I would not use a CAT scan to search for small areas of ischemia associated with TIA's, as resolution would be far better using an MRI. Also, a vertigo attack can be due to multiple causes, including inner ear pathology. Would you be better off seeing an otolaryngologist? Read more...
No. A TIA by definition has normal imaging and is not seen on CT or MRI. A CVA (stroke), however, of the cerebellum or brain stem is better visualized on an MRI. There are other causes for vertigo as well and you should seek an evaluation by your provider if the ER visits did not find a cause. Read more...