Who can I talk to with experience with neural tube defect or AFP test?

Neurologist. A neural tube defect is a congenital defect that appears at birth, and can be detected when the baby is still inside the mother in pregnancy, by ultrasound and mother's blood level of a protein associated with the spinal cord called alpha- fetoprotein, or AFP. A neurologist and neurosurgeon specialize in care of people with neural tube defects. You need to call your nearest specialty hospital ASAP.
If you are seeking a. 2nd opinion, ask your OB-GYN to refer you to a Fetal-Maternal Medicine Specialist at Children's Medical Center, https://www.childrens.com/specialties/maternal-fetal-medicine/. There you'll have a 3-D Ultrasound. If Spina Bifida or other NTD is confirmed, a pediatrician at CMC will assemble the team of pediatric subspecialists who will attend to your baby at delivery for seamless care.

Related Questions

Afp normal, enlarged brain ventricles, is it still possible to have a neural tube defect ntd?

AFP. A normal AFP reduces the risk of an open neural tube abnormality. Enlarged cerebral ventricles are usually not associated with neural tube abnormalities. Read more...

What is the best neural tube defect test?

NTD. The "best" test is an amniotic fluid AFP concentration. That picks up about 90% of open neural tube defects. However, an ultrasound examination also picks up the majority of open neural tube defects. Read more...

I want to know what's the neural tube defect test?

2 tests. To diagnose a neural tube defect the two most useful tests are 1) The mother's blood level of a protein that lines the inner surface of the developing spinal cord in the fetus, called alpha fetoprotein, and 2) a fetal or newborn ultrasound of the spinal canal itself. Other radiologic tests such as X-Ray films, CT scans, and MRI scans help to get a clearer picture of the neural tube defect. Read more...

What are the tests for neural tube defect?

Neural tube defects. The primary test is the maternal serum fetal protein. If that is abnormal, an ultrasound examination and perhaps an amniocentesis. Read more...
Ultrasound, MSAFP. Prenatal ultrasound should have >90% sensitivity for open neural tube defect detection around 20 weeks. Earlier (>16 weeks) risk stratification can occur with screening maternal blood for AFP - although that is not diagnostic and has to be followed by ultrasound for confirmation and/or differential diagnosis. Fetal MRI is used as part of evaluation for possible fetal surgery to treat spina bifida. Read more...

What is the chance of having another child with a neural tube defect?

8x greater risk. It has been shown that having a child with a neural tube defect increases the chance of having a second child with a similar defect. The recurrence risk in this situation is 8 times greater than the risk if no such history was present. Also if there is any family history of neural tube defects there is an increased risk of an affected pregnancy even if not immediate relative (2cd or 3d degree). Read more...

I have a high positive for increased open neural tube defect, now what?

Additional screening. A positive initial screening test should be followed by a more involved and dependable test looking for this possibility.A diagnostic high resolution ultrasound can be performed that can evaluate baby from top to bottom and see if there is any direct evidence of a problem. Discussion of these findings with a geneticist or perinatologist may then be needed if the problem is not excluded by the test. Read more...

Is a neural tube defect a chromosomal mutation or a gene mutation?

Both or neither. While neural tube disorders can be a genetic mutation (gene is a functional unit of heredity occupying a specific spot--locus--on a chromosome), they occur most commonly in the setting of Folic Acid deficiency during pregnancy--hence prenatal vitamins with folic acid. Ntds occur in 1/1000 births, and range from spina bifida occulta to anencephaly. Read more...

Is it true that a neural tube defect is a chromosomal mutation or a gene mutation?

Yes and more. Neural tube defects can be brought on by genetics, nutrition, and environmental factors. Women who are deficient in Folic Acid before or during pregnancy are at a higher risk for neural tube defects. Women who are obese, have poorly controlled diabetes, or take medication such as Dilantin, Tegretol, or Depakote are at higher risk for neural tube defects or anencephaly. I hope this helps. Take c. Read more...