How can I distinguish pain from dental caries and pain from periodontal tissue?

Not always easy. There is no simple way to do this and no need to anyway since if you do have any dental pain, you should see a dentist who is trained and experienced in diagnosing the cause of any problem. Even sensitivity to sweets, while typically is caused by dental decay, may occur from exposed root surface, defective filling, occlusal erosion, or fracture in tooth.
Sometimes you can't. An exam with radiographs goes a long way in detecting both cavities and periodontal problems. If the tooth hurts with sweets and/or cold food, good chance it is a cavity. If it hurts deep down in the bone, then it is probably periodontal in nature. These are just generalizations and do not apply to all situations.
See your dentist. It is always important to sort out the source and cause of the disease so that the right treatment can be selected and the tooth saved. See your dentist for consultation and treatment.
Eat something sweet. Eat something sweet , if no pain occurs , it's periodontal.If pain occurs it's a cavity .

Related Questions

How can you distinguish pain from dental caries and pain from periodontal tissue?

See a dentist. Sometimes the individual can not. You need to have a differential diagnosis of what it might be and see what evidence there is. Read more...
Caries can hurt. Dental caries ( tooth decay) can be painful especially with cold or sweets. Periodontal disease usually is not painful. Read more...
Type of pain. Pain from dental caries is more localized and tends to be very obvious as to which tooth or area is involved. Pain from periodontal disease usually occurs as a more diffuse, radiating pain, not localized to one tooth unless the gum problem is very isolated. Also, tooth pain is usually is reative to stimuli such as hot, cold, air, or sweets. Gum pain is not as reactive. Read more...
Dull vs sharp. Dental caries will not cause pain until the nerve is exposed while periodontal disease is like high blood pressure and does not cause pain. It does cause bleeding and odors the more advanced periodontaldisease advances. Read more...
Pain! Sometimes this can be difficult, but generally pain from caries (cavities) you will have hot and cold sensitivity along with increased pain. Pain from periodontal disease tends to be a dull sometimes constant ache. Read more...
Gum or tooth pain? In many cases it can be difficult to determine the cause of dental or periodontal pain. It can take some fairly sophisticated know-how and experience to determine the root cause of the dental disease. The only way to diagnose is by examination, tests and x-rays. Read more...
Dentist can! A dentist can do an examination and diagnosis the problem. The pain could be from either or both! It is very difficult to impossible for a lay person to determine . Read more...
Peri usually no pain. Periodontal disease for the most part is a painless disease. It usually goes unnoticed until it is found by a dentist or dental hygienist or until it causes an abscess which will cause pain and swelling. Pain from caries is usually more acute as the bacteria invade the dentinal tubules which contain small nerves or if advanced, attack the main nerve of the tooth causing toothache. Read more...
Dental Pain. Typically pain from periodontal tissues is more vague, more of a dull, achy pain that cannot be easily localized. Odontogenic pain (tooth pain) is usually sharp, more localized type of pain. Although either pain can mimmic the other at times. The best way to distinguish where tooth pain is coming from is to see a dentist for an exam. Read more...
Visit your dentist!! The dentist can distinguish between dental and periodontal pain by the use of a radiograph and a periodontal probe. If periodontal issues are evident, this can be diagnosed by the dentist and treated appropriately. Read more...
Dental pain. The source of dental pain can often be confusing. Only a thorough exam and X-rays by your dentist can determine the cause. Read more...
Thorough exam. Comprehensive examination including both panoramic and individual x-ray imaging , clinical exam with charting and probings, evaluation of the bite , and diagnostic casts as needed, would be a start. Depending on the findings, the differentiation may be made. Typically pain from caries would be exacerbated by cold, sweets and often heat. See a Periodontist for evaluation.Good Luck. Read more...
Differential Dx. Periodontal disease is often painless, so if you are having pain it may be coming from carious lesions and/or gum recession. In any event, both need to be treated, so see your local dentist for a thorough exam and a proper diagnosis of your problem. Read more...

How do I distinguish between pain from dental caries and pain from periodontal tissue?

Periodontal disease. It would be difficult for you to make the distinction. You must be checked and evaluated by your dentist for possible gum disease. Read more...
Good question. I agree with the others that your dentist can help - but generally cavities may be sensitive to sweets and hot/cold, exposed tooth roots can be sensitive to hot/cold as well, lingering pain can indicate a dying tooth, and pain on chewing can be from an abscess/infection. Generally periodontal problems and tissue do not hurt a lot, but they can be very destructive. Read more...

There is a whitish thing on the gum tissue of upper jaw. Could it be dental caries?

White spot. A white spot on your gum tissue is not dental caries, or tooth decay. There are several things that can cause a white spot on your gums. You need to see a dentist to find out exactly what it is. Read more...
No. Dental caries form on the hard structure of your teeth, not the soft tissues. Have the lesion evaluated by a local dentist. White lesions are not a normal part of your anatomy... Could be nothing serious, but it also might be. Read more...
No but... The gum tissue cannot have dental caries, but there are other concerns of white spots on the gum tissue that should be checked. It may be nothing, but why wait to have it looked at. Read more...
Definitely, no. Some conditions like white lesions on your gums may require further assessment, tests and your Dentist may schedule a follow-up appointment or refer you to a specialist to determine a diagnosis. Do not delay. Read more...

Teeth hurt over a yr. Saw 2 dentist at different locations that were of no help. 1st told me no cavities. 2nd said no periodontal disease & no cavity.

The daily grind. You may be experiencing symptoms of grinding, clenching your teeth. Especially if the teeth that hurt change from time to time ( like sometimes its these & then its those ). Try to raise yur level of awareness during the day if you tend to clench or grind ( catch yourself ). An easy fix is to have a well fitting passive niteguard made. Read more...
Also. There are other conditions rather than a tooth problem that may be causing what feels like tooth pain. It could be muscle or nerve in origin. I would suggest seeing a facial pain dentist for a diagnosis and treatment options. For a listing see www.Aaop.Org and www.Aacfp.Org. Read more...
Upper or lower teeth. Upper teeth will hurt due to sinus involvement. The roots of the upper bicuspids and molars interact with the maxillary sinuses. If there is a sinus problem (sinusitis), then these teeth may get sensitive, particularly to biting pressure. You might try an ENT consult next. Read more...
Difficult to answer . Difficult to answer on this forum. Don't know your age or your medical history. I would suggest you see an oral surgeon and have a complete oral and physical exam to determine what is causing your teeth to hurt. Read more...
Endodontist. These dental specialists are experts in diagnosing dental pain. Make an appt. Soon! often times endodontists can use a microscope to see cracks, etc that found be causing your pain. Read more...
Could be TMD. If 2 different dentists could find no decay or disease present it could be tmd. This jaw ache can mimic a toothache and occurs in people who clench their teeth or have bad bites. Read more...
Agree. I agree w dr van der werff. A neuralgia often times mimics tooth pain. I do however believe all dental reasons must be ruled out before referring to a neurologist. General dentist, endodontist, periodontist, and oral surgeons all make up a great team to rule out dental organic reasons for pain. That's when a neurologist is called in. Read more...
Other causes? Cavities and periodontal disease are rather easy to diagnose & therefore if two different dentists did not find either of these problems, it's unlikely that is the cause of your symptoms. Other possible causes are bruxism, fractures in the teeth, muscle or joint pain, sinusitis, exposed root surfaces, inflamed nerves or merely super sensitive teeth or combinations of these factors. Get 3rd opinion. Read more...