4 doctors weighed in:

Can lung disease be associated with dysphagia?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Cooke
Surgery - Thoracic
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Possibly

Depending on the cause of dysphagia, food and liquids may incompletely make it through the esophagus.
As a result, food may regurgitate back up and be inhaled or aspirated into the lungs, causing chronic pneumonia or acute lung injury.

In brief: Possibly

Depending on the cause of dysphagia, food and liquids may incompletely make it through the esophagus.
As a result, food may regurgitate back up and be inhaled or aspirated into the lungs, causing chronic pneumonia or acute lung injury.
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Dr. Marsha Davis
Internal Medicine

In brief: Possibly

A mass in the lung that puts pressure on the esophagus certainly could cause trouble swallowing.

In brief: Possibly

A mass in the lung that puts pressure on the esophagus certainly could cause trouble swallowing.
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Dr. Aaron Milstone
Internal Medicine - Pulmonology

In brief: Yes

If your lung cancer is close to the esophagus or involving lymph nodes near the esophagus this can affect your ability to swallow (known as dysphagia).
Usually a scan of the chest called a computerize tomography scan (ct) can help you and your doctor know if this is the case or not.

In brief: Yes

If your lung cancer is close to the esophagus or involving lymph nodes near the esophagus this can affect your ability to swallow (known as dysphagia).
Usually a scan of the chest called a computerize tomography scan (ct) can help you and your doctor know if this is the case or not.
Thank
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