10 doctors weighed in:
Can someone explain this to me.--post stroke aphasia)?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Michael Korona
Radiology - Interventional
5 doctors agree
In brief: Damage
To broca's area of the brain.

In brief: Damage
To broca's area of the brain.
Dr. Michael Korona
Dr. Michael Korona
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1 comment
Dr. Reza Karimi
Aphasia, or disordered speech may occur following damage to any number of areas of the brain which control speech. There are many types of aphasia, including receptive and expressive aphasia. Global aphasia is a more severe form, which affects the comprehension and expression of speech.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Aphasia
Aphasia is a disorder of language processing - it may take the form of poor comprehension (receptive aphasia) or inability to think of words (expressive aphasia).
The latter is more common. The individual is frustrated as they know what they want to say but can't find the words. Sometimes they can use a keyboard or point to pictures to communicate but not always. Speech therapy and time can help.

In brief: Aphasia
Aphasia is a disorder of language processing - it may take the form of poor comprehension (receptive aphasia) or inability to think of words (expressive aphasia).
The latter is more common. The individual is frustrated as they know what they want to say but can't find the words. Sometimes they can use a keyboard or point to pictures to communicate but not always. Speech therapy and time can help.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
Dr. Reza Karimi
Neurosurgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Speech/language
Aphasia is an impairment of language or speech that can occur following any type of injury (trauma, tumor, stroke, infection) which involves one the speech areas of the brain.

In brief: Speech/language
Aphasia is an impairment of language or speech that can occur following any type of injury (trauma, tumor, stroke, infection) which involves one the speech areas of the brain.
Dr. Reza Karimi
Dr. Reza Karimi
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Dr. Michael Chen
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Inability to speak
Aphasia after stroke occurs after the portion of the brain that controls language is injured from insufficient blood flow (often a clot).
Afterwards, patients appear attentive, and at times have the appearance of wanting to communicate, but are unable to either understand verbal or written language, or utter a sentence, or some combination of the two. Prognosis often depends on initial severity.

In brief: Inability to speak
Aphasia after stroke occurs after the portion of the brain that controls language is injured from insufficient blood flow (often a clot).
Afterwards, patients appear attentive, and at times have the appearance of wanting to communicate, but are unable to either understand verbal or written language, or utter a sentence, or some combination of the two. Prognosis often depends on initial severity.
Dr. Michael Chen
Dr. Michael Chen
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