What is the hereditary breast cancer gene?

BRCA 1 and BRCA 2. Your healthcare provider needs to be aware of your family history to be able to assess risk of certain cancers and to determine if genetic testing is appropriate. Having a brca mutation increases your risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Being aware of your cancer risk allows the opportunity to take action to prevent cancer.

Related Questions

Hereditary breast cancer gene, what is it?

Wsh I had more space. BRCA 1 and 2 are important genes that have the purpose of repairing damaged DNA and destroying the one that can't be repaired, amongst other things. When they get mutated (or changed) in specific places, they quit working so the damaged DNA is left in there, resulting in the development of cancer. . Read more...

What are the tests for hereditary breast cancer?

BRCA. To determine if you have a hereditary breast cancer, a complete history needs to be obtained. Based on this history and a mapping of your family's cancer history, a brca test may be performed. It is important to determine who in the family should be tested. It is now a saliva test that can be done in a physician office. Genetic counseling is also offered. Read more...
Questions! The best tool in assessing hereditary cancer including breast cancer is a thorough family history. After that the genetic tests that are used test for brca1, brca2, tp53, and pten. More can be found here: http://bit.Ly/myzjj9. Read more...

What are the symptoms of hereditary breast cancer?

Same as regular. Breast cancer. Only about 3% of the breast cancers are due to inherited defects and these cancers have the same symptoms as regular/sporadic cancer, i.e., mass/lump in the breast. Read more...
Young/Bilateral. Breast cancer symptoms are no different whether one has the hereditary or environmental form of the disease. However, women with the hereditary form tend to be diagnosed at an earlier age and have a higher incidence of cancer developing in both breasts. The telltale sign, of course, is a pattern of breast +/- ovarian cancer in multiple relatives. Read more...