6 doctors weighed in:

What exactly are eye floaters? Can they cast off large shadows? Been having floaters and now it seems like there getting worse and casting shadows.

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Colin McCannel
Ophthalmology - Retinal Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: If new, need exam

Floaters in the eye have several causes.
The most common cause is degeneration of the vitreous fluid. The floaters gradually get worse, and persist; these are degenerative fosters. Sudden increase in floaters may be caused by vitreous separation (detachment) and may associated with a retinal tear or detachment, and an urgent eye exam is advisable; these are acute floaters.

In brief: If new, need exam

Floaters in the eye have several causes.
The most common cause is degeneration of the vitreous fluid. The floaters gradually get worse, and persist; these are degenerative fosters. Sudden increase in floaters may be caused by vitreous separation (detachment) and may associated with a retinal tear or detachment, and an urgent eye exam is advisable; these are acute floaters.
Thank
Dr. Richard Wieder
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Floaters

Are very common in adults.
They are typically caused by aging changes of the vitreous jelly that fills the back of our eyes. When this degeneration occurs, small pockets of liquid develop and the jelly pulls away from the retina (the lining of the back of the eye). A small piece of tissue gets pulled away (the floater). If this has developed recently, see your eye doctor to rule out problems.

In brief: Floaters

Are very common in adults.
They are typically caused by aging changes of the vitreous jelly that fills the back of our eyes. When this degeneration occurs, small pockets of liquid develop and the jelly pulls away from the retina (the lining of the back of the eye). A small piece of tissue gets pulled away (the floater). If this has developed recently, see your eye doctor to rule out problems.
Thank
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Floaters

It sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment.
This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachment), it then "crumples" up leaving dots, spots, strands of blurry vitreous; i.e. The "floater". You should have an exam to ensure the incident did not tear the retina, which could lead to a retinal detachment.

In brief: Floaters

It sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment.
This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachment), it then "crumples" up leaving dots, spots, strands of blurry vitreous; i.e. The "floater". You should have an exam to ensure the incident did not tear the retina, which could lead to a retinal detachment.
Thank
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