8 doctors weighed in:
How does GERD lead to barrett's esophagus?
8 doctors weighed in

Brittany Chan
Pediatrics
5 doctors agree
In brief: Acidity+cell changes
Your esophagus is not designed to handle acidic secretions.
In gerd, the cells in the esophagus are frequently exposed to acidity and become damaged. Over time, the tissue adapts by changing its cells into ones similar to cells in the stomach. This called metaplasia. Because these kinds of cells are abnormal in the esophagus, people with barrett's are at greater risk for esophageal cancer.

In brief: Acidity+cell changes
Your esophagus is not designed to handle acidic secretions.
In gerd, the cells in the esophagus are frequently exposed to acidity and become damaged. Over time, the tissue adapts by changing its cells into ones similar to cells in the stomach. This called metaplasia. Because these kinds of cells are abnormal in the esophagus, people with barrett's are at greater risk for esophageal cancer.
Brittany Chan
Brittany Chan
Answer assisted by Brittany Chan, Medical Student
Thank
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Metaplasia
Reflux of gastric acid into the esophagus prompts changes in the epithelial lining of esophagus.
The epithelium changes from squamous to columnar to better resist the effects of acid. The change, metaplasia is the key component of barrett's.

In brief: Metaplasia
Reflux of gastric acid into the esophagus prompts changes in the epithelial lining of esophagus.
The epithelium changes from squamous to columnar to better resist the effects of acid. The change, metaplasia is the key component of barrett's.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
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