Why do post-cataract surgery retinal detachments occur? Is there some retinal pulling involved from posterior vitreous detachment (pvd)?

Destabilization. The natural lens and its supports stabilize the front of the eye and vitreous. Removal of the thick natural lens and substitution with a thin artificial lens, increases the chance for the vitreous to move in ways that can destabilize the attachments of the vitreous over the retina. If there are weak places, this can increase the chance of detachment, even in the best of cataract surgeries.
Uncommon. Retinal detachment after modern uncomplicated cataract surgery is rare. It is not related the the phenomenon of pvd. It is suspected that manipulation of instruments in the eye and the forces they generate can cause an already weakened or predisposed retina to detach during the post operative period.

Related Questions

For someone who had posterior vitreous detachment completed prior to cataract surgery, what is the risk of post-cataract surgery retinal detachment?

Very small . As vitreous traction is the main cause for retinal detachment following cataract surgery, if the vitreous is already separated, there would be no traction and thus the chance of a detachment would be very small. Read more...
No greater. In fact some may argue that since the potential traction the vitreous face places on the retina , you may be at less risk now. Read more...

If posterior vitreous detachment happen in yung high myopic like me without retinal tear, is der a chance of future retinal tear due 2 cataract/glucoma?

Higher. The risk is probably 10 x greater than a patient without these characteristics. Risk ia about 1/1000 unless you have a family history. Having glaucoma and a cataract do not increase this risk. Having cataract surgery does increase the risk of retinal tears. You should talk your eye md. Read more...
Unlikely. Vitreous detachments can cause retinal tears and rarely vitreous hemorrhage. Retinal tears can cause retinal detachments. Once a vitreous detachment has occurred without causing a retinal tear it is unlikely to lead to additional pathology in the future. It does usually cause floaters which can be annoying. Read more...

Does vitreous degeneration always lead to a posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) or pvd may not happen altogether in presence of vitreous degeneration?

PVD. Vitreous degeneration almost always leads to a pvd. Most pvds are benign, but a few may lead to a retinal tear or detachment...So they should be seen by your local eye doctor. Read more...

Can a 'complete' posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) be sometimes not associated with flashes of light at all, and have symptoms of only floaters?

yes. The flashing lights (photopsias) are due to light attachments between the vitreous edge and the underlying retina as it transitions to liquid. Mostly there are no such connections, therefore no light flashes. This is in fact the case with most people. Read more...
Absolutely. Many patients do not notice any symptoms of the pvd. Others note floaters and some note flashes. The point is that you should get an exam if you notice such symptoms. Remember that a posterior vitreous detachment is the culmination a long natural process. Read more...

If posterior vitreous detachment is caused by inflammation, is there any way of reducing this inflammation? I am 44 and have pvd in one eye already.

No. The vitreous starts out attached to the retina. Over the years, the vitreous changes, shrinking a bit, similar to the way a jello dessert shrinks and pulls away from the edge of a bowl over time. At some point in life, the vitreous may peel away from the retina. Read more...

Can anterior vitreous detachment occur before pvd? Does it reduce the retinal risks assoc with cataract surgery? Symptoms other than floaters?

Same risk of RD. The anterior hyaloid face is juxtaposed to the posterior capsule of the lens. The vitreous base is adjacent to the ora serrata. Any anterior segment trauma, including complicated cataract surgery, can cause either of these regions of the vitreous to involute before the posterior vitreous. Changes in the vitreous composition account for the high rate of pvd. Retinal tears cause the rd. Read more...
Vitreous detachment. May occur at the level of the anterior retina adjacent to an area called the ora serrata. The vitreous may delaminate from the retina at any location, meaning either posterior or anterior at anytime either from trauma or idiopathic. If the vitreous is already detached from the retina, then the risks of a retinal detachment is theoretically reduced. Read more...