26 doctors weighed in:

Is obesity a common cause of gerd?

26 doctors weighed in
Dr. Arthur Heller
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
8 doctors agree

In brief: Common, aggravates

Agree with other answers.
If overweight or obese, often get at least some symptom relief with weight loss, likely a combo of diet change and the weight loss itself affecting lower esophageal sphincter function. Just another reason to get weight down, if overweight. Easier said than done.

In brief: Common, aggravates

Agree with other answers.
If overweight or obese, often get at least some symptom relief with weight loss, likely a combo of diet change and the weight loss itself affecting lower esophageal sphincter function. Just another reason to get weight down, if overweight. Easier said than done.
Dr. Arthur Heller
Dr. Arthur Heller
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Dr. Don W Hodson
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Obesity and GERD

The short answer is yes.
Anything that increases the intra-abdominal pressure (too much belly fat) will lead to acid in the stomach being forced up into the lower esophagus and cause heartburn. Also, the diet that typically accompanies obesity tends to stimulate excess acid production. Even a modest weight loss (10% or more) will often alleviate gerd symptoms.

In brief: Obesity and GERD

The short answer is yes.
Anything that increases the intra-abdominal pressure (too much belly fat) will lead to acid in the stomach being forced up into the lower esophagus and cause heartburn. Also, the diet that typically accompanies obesity tends to stimulate excess acid production. Even a modest weight loss (10% or more) will often alleviate gerd symptoms.
Dr. Don W Hodson
Dr. Don W Hodson
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Dr. Kenneth Adler
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not exactly

Obesity is a contributing factor but not really a cause.
Plenty of people who have obesity don't have it and plenty that are thin do. That said, being overweight can make you more likely to have it. Pushinng the stomach up partially through the diaphragm causes what is caused a hiatal hernia. Folks with hiatal hernias are also more likely to have gerd.

In brief: Not exactly

Obesity is a contributing factor but not really a cause.
Plenty of people who have obesity don't have it and plenty that are thin do. That said, being overweight can make you more likely to have it. Pushinng the stomach up partially through the diaphragm causes what is caused a hiatal hernia. Folks with hiatal hernias are also more likely to have gerd.
Dr. Kenneth Adler
Dr. Kenneth Adler
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Dr. Jeffrey Crespin
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
2 doctors agree

In brief: GERD

Yes. The common beer belly increases gastric pressure.
This makes it more common for gastric contents to come back up after one eats. Similarly, patients who are overweight with gerd, who lose weight can have improvement in gerd sxs.

In brief: GERD

Yes. The common beer belly increases gastric pressure.
This makes it more common for gastric contents to come back up after one eats. Similarly, patients who are overweight with gerd, who lose weight can have improvement in gerd sxs.
Dr. Jeffrey Crespin
Dr. Jeffrey Crespin
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Dr. James Underberg
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Obesity causes GERD

Gerd, gastroesophageal reflux disease (commonly knows as heartburn) is seen more frequently in people with obesity.
In a study published in the annals of internal medicine in 2005, which looked at a group of gerd studies, an association was seen between obesity and not only gerd but also erosive esophagitis, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Ann intern med. 2005 aug 2;143(3):199-211.

In brief: Obesity causes GERD

Gerd, gastroesophageal reflux disease (commonly knows as heartburn) is seen more frequently in people with obesity.
In a study published in the annals of internal medicine in 2005, which looked at a group of gerd studies, an association was seen between obesity and not only gerd but also erosive esophagitis, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Ann intern med. 2005 aug 2;143(3):199-211.
Dr. James Underberg
Dr. James Underberg
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Dr. Franklyn Farrell
Occupational Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Yes, as well as dietary choices.
Try to avoid acidic foods like tomato, lemon juice, orange juice, or carbonated drinks, avoid caffeine, alcohol, peppermint, and fatty foods too, as these are common triggers as well. Hope this helps.

In brief: Yes

Yes, as well as dietary choices.
Try to avoid acidic foods like tomato, lemon juice, orange juice, or carbonated drinks, avoid caffeine, alcohol, peppermint, and fatty foods too, as these are common triggers as well. Hope this helps.
Dr. Franklyn Farrell
Dr. Franklyn Farrell
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Dr. Dean Giannone
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

With obesity, increased abdominal girth increases intra abdominal pressure, which then exceeds the pressure in the chest cavity and promotes the backwards flow of stomach contents into the esophagus, i.
e. Gerd.

In brief: Yes

With obesity, increased abdominal girth increases intra abdominal pressure, which then exceeds the pressure in the chest cavity and promotes the backwards flow of stomach contents into the esophagus, i.
e. Gerd.
Dr. Dean Giannone
Dr. Dean Giannone
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Dr. Jonathan Leibowitz
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: YES YES YES

Obesity is probably the number one cause of this thing we now call "gerd" - GERD used to be known as indigestion - you knew - eat the pizza - get the heartburn - now we have 'diseased' it - its a 'condition' - its all bs - if got skinny and stopped bad foods - 90% of "gerd" wouldnt exist - but, hell, - pizza and hot dogs are good - so thats why god made Nexium (esomeprazole) -.

In brief: YES YES YES

Obesity is probably the number one cause of this thing we now call "gerd" - GERD used to be known as indigestion - you knew - eat the pizza - get the heartburn - now we have 'diseased' it - its a 'condition' - its all bs - if got skinny and stopped bad foods - 90% of "gerd" wouldnt exist - but, hell, - pizza and hot dogs are good - so thats why god made Nexium (esomeprazole) -.
Dr. Jonathan Leibowitz
Dr. Jonathan Leibowitz
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Dr. Theodore Cole
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Obesity certainly contributes, and can make a person more susceptible to this condition.

In brief: Yes

Obesity certainly contributes, and can make a person more susceptible to this condition.
Dr. Theodore Cole
Dr. Theodore Cole
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Dr. Cynthia Point
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It is

It can be, but thin people can have it too.
When a person is obese, there is a lot of fat inside the abdomen, not just fat under the skin. That fat crowds the internal organs, like the stomach and the bladder, and the stomach can be pushed up part way into the chest, increasing the gerd. It is usually helpful in treating gerd to loose weight if overweight, and weight loss helps other conditions.

In brief: It is

It can be, but thin people can have it too.
When a person is obese, there is a lot of fat inside the abdomen, not just fat under the skin. That fat crowds the internal organs, like the stomach and the bladder, and the stomach can be pushed up part way into the chest, increasing the gerd. It is usually helpful in treating gerd to loose weight if overweight, and weight loss helps other conditions.
Dr. Cynthia Point
Dr. Cynthia Point
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Dr. Andrew Carroll
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Being obese directly affects the intraabdominal pressure, which then leads to increase stomach pressure, and that causes stomach contents to move into the esophagus.
Overeating, a leading cause of obesity, implies that the stomach is chronically full as well, and this can lead to weakening of the lower esophageal sphincter, which increases the risk of gerd.

In brief: Yes

Being obese directly affects the intraabdominal pressure, which then leads to increase stomach pressure, and that causes stomach contents to move into the esophagus.
Overeating, a leading cause of obesity, implies that the stomach is chronically full as well, and this can lead to weakening of the lower esophageal sphincter, which increases the risk of gerd.
Dr. Andrew Carroll
Dr. Andrew Carroll
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Dr. Martin Fried
General Practice

In brief: Yes

Obesity increases the pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter causing food in the stomach to reflux into the esophagus.
Losing weight is a great way to decrease the incidence of GERD in an obese person. a !0% weight loss from the starting weight is enough to make a difference in the severity and frequency of the episodes.

In brief: Yes

Obesity increases the pressure on the lower esophageal sphincter causing food in the stomach to reflux into the esophagus.
Losing weight is a great way to decrease the incidence of GERD in an obese person. a !0% weight loss from the starting weight is enough to make a difference in the severity and frequency of the episodes.
Dr. Martin Fried
Dr. Martin Fried
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