7 doctors weighed in:

Testicular cancer from cycling or testosterone use?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Warner
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: No and No

There is no evidence that cycling is a cause of testicular cancer.
As this is a cancer most common in young men it may seem like there is a correlation, but no, cycling does not increase the risk of cancer. Testosterone use will make ones own testicles less active, which may be important, but it does not cause testicular cancer. In certain settings it may be linked to prostate cancer.

In brief: No and No

There is no evidence that cycling is a cause of testicular cancer.
As this is a cancer most common in young men it may seem like there is a correlation, but no, cycling does not increase the risk of cancer. Testosterone use will make ones own testicles less active, which may be important, but it does not cause testicular cancer. In certain settings it may be linked to prostate cancer.
Dr. Robert Warner
Dr. Robert Warner
Thank
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Neither...

But you may be channeling lance armstrong.
It may be familial, is common in young men with undescended testis even if placed properly with surgery, indicating a developmental problem. Boys and young men most common, older men can get seminoma type. Testosterone shrinks testes. Anabolic testosterone type hormones assoc. With liver tumors too.

In brief: Neither...

But you may be channeling lance armstrong.
It may be familial, is common in young men with undescended testis even if placed properly with surgery, indicating a developmental problem. Boys and young men most common, older men can get seminoma type. Testosterone shrinks testes. Anabolic testosterone type hormones assoc. With liver tumors too.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Not likely.

Testicular cancer has an unknown cause.
There is an association with the cytogenetic defect isochromosome 12p. It is increased in cases of cryptorchid testes, and is 4-5 times more common in whites than african americans. Risk is also higher in testicular feminization syndromes. Early orchiopexy may be protective.

In brief: Not likely.

Testicular cancer has an unknown cause.
There is an association with the cytogenetic defect isochromosome 12p. It is increased in cases of cryptorchid testes, and is 4-5 times more common in whites than african americans. Risk is also higher in testicular feminization syndromes. Early orchiopexy may be protective.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Steven Seres
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
17 years in practice
497K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors