How does someone get cancer of salivary gland?

Rare cancer. Although there is no single predominant risk factor for salivary gland tumors, potential ones include radiation exposure, cigarette smoking (whartin tumor only), certain viral infections, and some environmental and industrial hazards. Salivary gland tumors are relatively rare, accounting for less than 10% of head/neck tumors.
Likely tobacco. Apart from natural disease, tobacco use (including smokeless) is probably the most likely way to get any head and neck cancer, let alone salivary. The time can vary, but usually it takes long. Patients usually present at over age 50, and can have non-healing, painful ulcers. Rock hard cervical or supraclavicular lymph nodes indicate metastasis.
Risk factors. These are rare cancers and at least a dozen sub-types. It is thus hard to adequately study risk factors for causation, since such studies need large numbers of patients of the same disease to study. There is not one clear factor, say, for example, like the case of smoking causing lung cancer. For salivary tumors, there is evidence that substantial radiation exposure in childhood may be causative.

Related Questions

Can one get salivary gland cancer from oral sex?

No. No salivary gland cancers are associated with stis. Some tonsil and oropharyngeal cancers, however, are associated with high risk hpv (like cervical cancers). Read more...
Unlikely. You can get an hpv virus from oral sex, and it can possibly cause oral cancer, in extremely rare cases hpv virus was found in salivary glands, it is thought that it may increase chances of getting salivary gland cancer but doesn't cause it directly. But the salivary gland cancer is very rare type of cancer in us. Read more...

What is the difference between salivary gland cancer and oral cancer?

Cancer. Oral cancers include the lips, lining of the mouth, floor of mouth and the tongue. Squamous cell cancer is the most common type of oral cancer. They are commonly associated with tobacco, smokeless tobacco and alcohol use and abuse. Salivary gland cancers involve the the salivary glands which include the parotid, submandibular and minor salivary glands. Read more...
Good question. You can have a salivary gland cancer which presents in the mouth (oral cavity), as you have hundreds of minor salivary glands in the mouth. Most tumors arising front minor salivary glands are malignant (opposite is true from the major glands). However, most of the time "oral cancer" is going to refer to squamous cell or another tumor from the lining of the mouth. Read more...
Location. There are 3 pairs of main salivary glands, in front of both ears, under the jaw and under the tongue. Cancers of these glands are salivary gland cancers. Cancer of the lining of the inside of the mouth are oral cavity cancers. Read more...
Very different. Salivary cancer is of the saliva glands such as parotid, submandibular, or minor glands. Oral cancer is of the lining of the mouth usually caused by smoking. Read more...

Could there be a difference betw salivary gland cancer and oral cancer?

Yes and no. Most salivary gland cancers are within the oral cavity, but the generic term of oral cancer usually refers to squamous cell carcinoma. Read more...
Depends. Oral cancer refers to any malignancy in the mouth. Lingual salivary gland tumors manifest this way. But most parotid salivary gland tumors may not. There are all sorts of other tumors that star right in the mouth, as tongue, mucosal, gingival. , etc. Read more...

What type of benign lesions are there for a hard painless bump on palate? What percentage is there that it's salivary gland cancer or palatial cancer?

Some. People are born with growth, and is normal, if smoker, should have ENT check. No salivary glands on palate. Read more...
Bump on palate. A hard painless bump in the middle of the palate is usually bone, called a torus palatinus. It is normal, occurs in many people, and varies in size. You should, however, have any swelling examined by your dentist to check for a palatal cyst, oral cancer, or other lesions that can cause swelling and are not painful. Read more...
Have it checked . Lumps in the mouth be the result of a number of things. They range from benign cysts and tumors to things that are more serious like cancer. If you smoke and/or drink, it raises your risk of having something serious. It's best to have it checked by your doctor. Read more...
Probably torus. 1 out of every 4 people have a hard painless midline benign boneyard growth called a torus palatinus. Any lump or growth should be evaluated asap by your dentist to rule out other causes. Unless you drink excessively, smoke, have ill-fitting dentures, or have hiv, chances of oral cancer are very rare. For peace of mind, and to rule out any other lesions, call your dentist...Now. Read more...

Is it possible for me to develope cancer in the mouth or salivary gland if no one in my family have any history of cancer at all?

Low risk. Without a family history you are at a low risk for these cancers. To reduce your risk further, please abstain from use of tobacco and alcohol. Read more...
Unlikely genetic. Genetic link in oropharyngeal cancers is not established, although higher incidence seen in certain anemias like fanconi etc. At your age , don't worry , smoking , drinking , tobacco & betel nut chewing , & oral hpv virus infections are all contributing factors. So with good healthy habits along with good oral hygiene you can minimize the risk. Read more...
Yes. Other factors including social carcinogenic agents (smoking and chewing tobacco) and well as other factors may predispose you to oral cancer. Read more...
Oral cancer. Risk at your age is very low. Minimize your risks by avoiding tobacco in all forms and excessive alcohol consumption. It you do both, the risk rises greatly. All patients should get a full head and neck soft tissue screening along with routine dental check-ups every 6-12 months. If your own dentist does not do that as part of his\her normal protocol, ask or change dentists. . Read more...
Posible, but . not probable. See your dentist. They are experts in maxillofacial pathology disorders. Your symptoms should be viewed as a group of related conditions or separate issues. Call your dentist for evaluation appointment. Good luck. Read more...

Under my jaw one of my mandibular salivary glands is firmer and not as smooth as the other. Poked it a lot worried. Cancer? I'm 22

Don't worry. It is always best to share your concern with Your dentist to be sure. Read more...
Blockage, see DDS. Blockage makes saliva back up inside the duct, causing the salivary gland to swell and become firmer. The treatment varies with the cause. See your dentist today. Read more...