4 doctors weighed in:

Kicked a bed about 3 months ago, now my toe still hurts when I try to bend it. Maybe jammed or fractured?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Traci Buxton
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

If your toe hurts when you move it for more than a couple of weeks following an injury, it's time to come see your doctor for an examination and foot x-ray.

In brief: Yes

If your toe hurts when you move it for more than a couple of weeks following an injury, it's time to come see your doctor for an examination and foot x-ray.
Dr. Traci Buxton
Dr. Traci Buxton
Thank
Dr. Thomas Rohde
General Practice

In brief: Fractured?

Discomfort that lasts 3 months would make me think of a fracture that you keep re-injuring when walking/bending the toe.
Xray would confirm, but treatment to speed healing is usually same - tape to next toe to prevent flexion, use firm shoe with little flex to sole, at the extreme a post surgical shoe from a medical supply store.

In brief: Fractured?

Discomfort that lasts 3 months would make me think of a fracture that you keep re-injuring when walking/bending the toe.
Xray would confirm, but treatment to speed healing is usually same - tape to next toe to prevent flexion, use firm shoe with little flex to sole, at the extreme a post surgical shoe from a medical supply store.
Dr. Thomas Rohde
Dr. Thomas Rohde
Thank
Dr. Joseph De santi
Family Medicine

In brief: Tip Toe Trauma

It is very possible the toe was fractured originally and now has what is known as a "non-union".
Sometimes a broken bone will heal but the "bond" between the broken fragments remains like cartilage, flexible and soft, rather than hardening like concrete. When this happens, the callous (as we call it), will allow movement to occur in a place where it shouldn't. As a result pain will occur.

In brief: Tip Toe Trauma

It is very possible the toe was fractured originally and now has what is known as a "non-union".
Sometimes a broken bone will heal but the "bond" between the broken fragments remains like cartilage, flexible and soft, rather than hardening like concrete. When this happens, the callous (as we call it), will allow movement to occur in a place where it shouldn't. As a result pain will occur.
Dr. Joseph De santi
Dr. Joseph De santi
Thank
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