Can breastfeeding help my postpartum depression?

Yes. Every time a breastfeeding mom thinks about the baby, there is a surge of oxytocin, which induces milk "let down." oxytocin's nickname is the "love hormone, " and it produces feelings of calmness, warmth and affection. Fathers can secrete it when they look at their baby, too! it's safe to continue breastfeeding while taking most medications for depression -- consult your local lactation center.
Breast feeding. Bonding with your baby is a factor to reduce post-partem depression, along with hormonal changes during the process.
Get treatment . If you have ppd, you should seek treatment from a mental health professional with expertise in perinatal issues. To respond to your question, some women find that nursing helps them feel better and others find they feel better once they stop nursing (as then their estrogen levels increase). Unfortunately, there is no way to know beforehand which group you fit into.
No. Non breast feeding is one of the risk factors to develop a postpartum depression, however, it is not clear whether breast feeding curtails or ameliorate the postpartum depression. Psychosocial therapy is recommended as the first line treatment.
Yes. Oxytocin, one of the hormones released during nursing is an anti-depressant. Breastfeeding will also help you strengthen the bond with your baby. That being said, however, many women suffering from PPD find it difficult to breastfeed. 10-40% of women experience some degree of "the blues" after the birth of their baby. Talk to your dr. About any depressive emotions you may be feeling.

Related Questions

How long can postpartum depression last? I am breastfeeding.

Get help fast! Postpartum depression has huge effects on both mom and baby. Get help fast! treatments can be very safe while breastfeeding. You can start with therapy or counseling and support groups. Some need meds, and there are ones safe while breastfeeding. If you are having problems with breastfeeding, get help from a lactation consultant because nursing problems can cause more stress. Read more...
Long time. It may linger for years, especially with a previous hx. Breast feeding and most meds are not incompatable, get help or stay miserable and get worse. Read more...
Ppd. Depends on prior history of depression and complications from labor/delivery as well as family history and prior treatment, usually 1-3 months. Read more...

If I am breastfeeding, can I take medication for postpartum depression?

Yes. All medications have some risks but there are several antidepressants that are safe during breastfeeding. There can be some feeding difficulties and the mediations do generally go into the breast milk. Wellbutrin, (bupropion) prozac, zoloft and Celexa are the names of some the medications that can be used. Read more...
Yes. There are medicines to treat postpartum depression that are safe during breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor. Also think about going to a support group, meeting with a therapist, and seeing a psychiatrist. Read more...
Consult a physician. There are some medications are are considered relatively safe for breastfeeding women to take. Consult your physician and your lactation consultant. There is always a risk-benefit ratio that must be determined for each individual patient. Read more...

5mths postpartum, exclusively breastfeeding, what are some of the symptoms of postpartum depression and how is it treated?

Symptoms are the . same as a depressed mood at any time. Unfortunately, PPD can harmfully impact your baby's development. Persistence of " baby blues" past 2 weeks or onset between 1-12 mos. after delivery requires referral for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy & discussion of pros & cons of meds during breastfeeding. Tell both your OB & your pediatrician. See http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007215.htm. Read more...

5mths postpartum, exclusively breastfeeding. How can PPD (postpartum depression) affect ones sex life?

Yes, it can. In fact, it can effect everything and is very worth seeking specialized treatment for. The well-being of your entire family (especially you) is in the balance. It's a common condition w/ elements that come from hormone changes, life demands, emotional intensity of relationships, etc. A good fit w/ an experienced therapist really helps. If meds are needed briefly they'll help select the right one. Read more...
Absolutely . If you are depressed then things that are normally pleasurable are'nt.If you find that this is the case with you ,hVe you primary refer you for psychotherapy. Read more...

Had to stop breast feeding, could that happen worsened my postpartum depression?

Possibly . When you breastfeed hormones are released and one of them is oxytocin. In addition to helping with milk let down it helps relax the mother and make her feel more nuturing toward her child. It can help provide a sense of well being. This could exacerbate existing depression. Post partum depression can become significant so should not be ignored. Read more...

What will treat postpartum depression?

Medication/PsyhoT. Medication to help you manage sx, psychotherapy to help you build coping skills, identify maladaptive thoughts, help you re-establish self-care routine and help with managing stress. Read more...
Goodness. There are over 20 drugs for depression, . It depends on your history, etc, but using a low dose medication for sleep can be helpful, some evidence that replacing estrogen can help; psychotherapy can be very good too, don't believe too much of your downside thinking. Read more...
PPD: Think Group. In addition to psychotherapy, try to explore group therapy or meet ups. This can be in a formal setting like a postpartum support group or a less formal local mom meet up. One of the goals is to increase your social support network and avoid taking on PPD alone. Read more...

What is postpartum depression? Is it serious?

Postpartum . depression is a psychological disorder which occurs in women after child birth. It is a very serious form of depression which can endanger both the mother and child if left untreated. Suicidal and homocidal thoughts can accompany the depression. Psychotherapy and medication can help overcome this disorder. Read more...

How do I know if I have postpartum depression?

You may not know... It is easy to feel overwhelmed as a new mother--reach out! i would recommend speaking with your obstetrician or social worker at the hospital you had delivered at and informing him/her of your current state of mind and how you are feeling. You should not feel ashamed to talk with your family or doctor about how you are feeling nor should any of your symptoms be dismissed or taken lightly. Read more...
Call your physician. Contact a mental health professional with specialization/expertise in assessment and treatment of postpartum depression. You can contact postpartum support, international at www.Postpartum.Net. Read more...
Do speak with. Someone. I agree with dr scarantino. Don't wait if you are unsure whether it's post partum or not, speaking with your doctor or a therapist will help you figure out what s wrong.. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...

How do I know if I have postpartum depression?

Psychiatric Eval. Between the changes in hormones and life style that come after childbirth, it is very common for a woman to have mood swings and to feel down. This can be accompanied by feeling overwhelmed, being more tearful, difficulty sleeping and feeling anxious, jittery or irritable. This is called the postpartum blues and it happens to more than half of women. It can increase for several days after your >. Read more...
Psychiatric eval. Depression is not uncommon after childbirth, although mild "baby blues" are more common. Symptoms to look for include sadness/numbness, loss of interest in pleasurable activities, changes in sleep or appetite, guilt or worry, poor concentration, low energy, feeling heavy or slow. If there are any thoughts about wanting to not be alive or harm oneself or the baby it could be an emergency. Read more...