I feel colonoscopy is invasive. Are there less embarrassing ways to look for colonic polyps?

Possibly. For a full evaluation of your colon, a virtual colonoscopy or ct colonography may be an option. This is a specialized examination using the ct scanner performed by certain centers. Ask your doctor if this option is available in your area.
Yes. Patients can also undergo a special CT scan-also known as virtual colonoscopy to look for colon polyps. Unfortunately, if one sees polyps on virtual colonoscopy, then one still needs to undergo the real colonoscopy to remove them.
Yes. A virtual colonoscopy/ct scan can be less embarrassing but this technique will never be the gold standard. In addition to what has already been stated by my colleagues about having to go through a regular colonoscopy if there are findings, the most common complaint I hear is the prep, which is the same for either procedure. The virtual may be better for low risk patients who still want to know.
Yes. An alternative is a virtual colnonscopy but this still involves having a catheter inserted into your rectum to inject dye followed by a ct scan. Stool blood testing can be done but it is nonspecific. Positive stool blood testing commonly leads to colonoscopies. Remember you are "asleep" for a colonoscopy.
Yes. Sure you can do a virtual - but if you find something that needs a biopsy - its back to the prep and then get ready for the scope - so might as well get over it and do it right the first time -.
Yes. Virtual colonoscopy is less "invasive" but requires a similar prep procedure and requires a direct colonoscopy if any abnormality is discovered. It also carries a very heavy dose of radiation. Be reminded that most endoscopist use sedation which leaves you with no awareness or memory of the procedure. Traditional colonoscopy is still the gold standard.
Yes. If you are screening for colon cancer the United States task force on preventative health recommends one of three methods, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing (fobt). They should start in average risk patients at age 50. No one method has been shown to be superior for colon cancer screening. Discuss the options with your physician.
Yes. Barium enema is an xray that will show colon polyps. However, the preference for finding colon polyps with colonoscopy is because if there are polyps present they can be removed at the time of the procedure and sent for examination for cancer. If barium enema shows polyps you will then need a colonoscopy to remove the polyps.
Yes. There is a procedure called a virtual colonsocopy that is performed by radiology. You still need to undergo the prep to get quality results. If the test is positive a colonoscopy would be the recommended follow-up.
Yes. A qualified "yes" - there are alternatives - the barium enema, and the virtual colonoscopy, but long story short, they're just not as accurate as the traditional colonoscopy. Even the virtual colonoscopy might miss smaller but potentially precancerous polyps.
Another test is the stool analysis for minute amounts of blood, which can be an early sign of polyps. There are test under development which also use a stool sample to check for genetic markers of higher risk, but they are not widely used. If there is blood, then a colonoscopy would be needed.
Yes. There is another test, ct colonoscopy, which can identify polyps. There are several problems with this approach, however. There is radiation involved, which can be quite high. If a polyp is identified, then a regular colonoscopy must be done to remove it, and only after it is removed can it be looked at in pathology to see if it has the potential to turn into cancer. The prep is the same.
Yes. There is a procedure called virtual colonoscopy. It is less embarrassing, but if it does find polyps then one has to have a traditional colonoscopy to test/ remove these polyps and you still have to use the same bowel prep. Insurance payment is rare for this procedure when used for screening. And although the colonoscopy seems embarrassing, the medications used allow you to be comfortable.
Yes. Yes, but none that are better than colonoscopy. With colonoscopy, not only do you get the diagnostic test done, but if a polyp is found, it is easily removed. Other tests do not give you that benefit.

Related Questions

I'm scared of getting an colonoscopy to look for colonic polyps. Does it hurt?

No. In the hands of a well trained gastroenterologist using the right sedation, you should feel no pain during colonoscopy. The procedure should last around 20 to 30 minutes. You may feel some bloating after colonoscopy. You need to ask your gastroenterologist what type of sedation is used. Propofol is clearly superior to versed/valium.
Yes. You will receive procedural sedation, which means medications will be given like versed and result in moderate sedation (formerly called conscious sedation). Versed causes short term amnesia, so you will most likely not remember the procedure and likely ask if they are going to start the procedure when it is actually completed. The final answer is that you will most likely not have pain.
No. As stated above, an anesthesiologist is present during the test to give sedation and pain medication. So while there is pain, you should not avoid the test because a) you will receive medication to prevent it and b) the sedative causes you to forget what happened during the test. For example: having surgery to remove a gallbladder has pain, the pain is completely treated and you're sedated.

I'm scared of getting an colonoscopy to look for colonic polyps. Will they knock me out?

Yes. Fifteen years ago, most colonoscopy was done with versed or Valium for sedation. More commonly today, we use Propofol which gives complete sedation, but a faster recovery. Prior to any colonoscopy, you need to ask your gastroenterologist what type of medication is used for sedation. In my office, we use Propofol with a real american trained anesthesiologist not a crna giving sedation.
Yes. You will receive procedural sedation, which means medications will be given like versed and result in moderate sedation (formerly called conscious sedation). Versed causes short term amnesia, so you will most likely not remember the procedure and likely ask if they are going to start the procedure when it is actually completed. The final answer is that you will most likely not have pain.
Most likely. Typically you will be sedated for your colonoscopy. In most instances, you will not remember much from the exam. It is a very safe examination.

What is the cause for colon polyps? I went in for my five year colonoscopy and they removed three. Five years ago, they removed two. These are benign

Not known. It is good that you had colonoscopy and had the polyps removed. We do not know the exact cause of polyps. It is likely a combination of genetics, diet and environment. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex.

Can colon polyps or caner cause bladder irritation or UTI I am waiting for a colonoscopy and now getting bladder irritation and frequency of urine.?

Not with polyps. Bladder irritation and colonic fistula (connection to bladder and colon) usually not due to polyps but due to diverticulitis which is a benign disease. Don't worry wait until tests are complete. .

In my 30s.Eat healthy diet, normal weight, exercise. Have had 5 colon polyps removed between my last 2 colonoscopies? 4 benign, 1 tubular adenoma. Common?

Follow-up care. Colon polyps are not normal, but it is good that you had colonoscopy to have these removed. Do you have family history of colon cancer? Even if you do not, do follow your doctor's advice for follow-up colonoscopy at no more than five years from now. Wish you good health.

In my 30s. Eat healthy diet and exercise. Have had 5 colon polyps removed between my last to colonoscopies? All benign. 1 tubular adenoma. Risk?

Real risk. Your diet and exercise have little or no impact on your likelihood of developing colon cancer, but are very much worth doing for their own sake, for the fitness satisfaction, and other health benefits. This is mostly about your genes and dumb luck. You'll want to be 'scoped fairly often and little lesions removed promptly to reduce your risk greatly.

Is a colon polyp more likely to grow fast if it's cancerous? I had a colonoscopy last year with no polyps, had a very large polyp removed today

Sort ofm. Since you were negative a year ago, you must have bled to warrant re-exam. Rapid growth is a sign of cancer. I note you do not use. 81 mg Aspirin that may inhibit polyp transformation and growth.