Need gum surgery for receding gums, which is better, donor gum tissue or using gum graft from the roof of the mouth?

Graft. I always see that, it is not the product, but it is the hand of the doctor that matters in many successful cases. Rather than a product choice, find out which product you and your surgeon would most benefit from to get you the best possible result?
Your own tissue. Using tissue harvested from the roof of your mouth always provides the best results.

Related Questions

Receding gums. Want to avoid recommended gum graft w/alloderm. How likely is it to lose teeth from this in the future if I choose not to have surgery?

No way to predict. It's always hard to predict the future. It depends upon so many factors including but not limited to: the extent of the recession, your oral hygiene, the type and amount of the remaining gum, your brushing habits, your general health over time, habits such as bruxism, and the luck of the draw, etc. Your own periodontist can give you the best prediction. Monitor it & reconsider your decision! Read more...
Depends on Severity. Gum recession does not always mean your gums are not healthy. 1 can have lots of recession and yet have super healthy gums! there needs to be specific reason for grafting: root sensitivity? R u prone to decay in areas where root exposed by recess'n? Cosmetic issue? Recession has to be very severe to actually lose teeth from it or u'd have to be v. Caries prone. Perio otherwise ok: graft not essent. Read more...

I had gum graft surgery over 2 years ago and it still bothers me. The roof of my mouth still hurts and so does part of my tongue.?

Check it out. gum tissue heals relatively quickly so if bothering you 2 years later says something is wrong. You need to have it looked at. Read more...
Chronic Pain. See Orofacial Pain specialist for evaluation, diagnosis and management. Any additional dental surgery or treatment is not recommended. Read more...

Does the roof of the mouth hurt post op after getting a sub tissue gum graft for one big tooth?

Yes if donor site. Very often the donor site for a connective tissue or free gingival tissue graft is the roof of one's mouth, so yes the roof of your mouth could hurt if indeed that is the area of the donor site. Be sure to follow all the post-op instructions very carefully to insure a very good result. Read more...
Gingival Graft. Pain may occur following a gingival graft surgery. It is a surgical procedure and is not completely risk-free. Pain, swelling, bad breath and infection following surgery is usually at its worst 24 – 48 hours after surgery. After that it should subside more and more every day and after 7 days stop. Good luck. . Read more...

In a connective tissue gum graft, how does a dentist stop all the blood flowing into ones mouth when cutting the palate for the tissue?

Surgical Assistant. The surgical assistant will assist your dentist during the surgery. The anesthetic contains epinephrine which helps decrease blood flow at the surgical site, and suctioning the area will also help. You have to remember that your dental providers have thousands of hours of education and that much more in experience. Don't worry about such things. Read more...

Where else in mouth can a gum graft be taken from besides the palate? I heard tissue behind the upper last molar is less traumatic.

Results. There are many different types of gum grafts, areas to collect tissue, and different methods. Which type your dentist uses on you will depend on your specific needs. Some dentists and patients prefer to use graft material from a tissue bank instead of from the roof of the mouth. Personally, i would want the technique with the best chance of success. Discuss your options with your own dentist. Read more...
Ask your periodontis. A sliding graft may be an alternative, however the palate provides the the most gingiva and it's easy to access. As far as the area behind the back molar is concerned, i would be concerned about access. Use the techniques that are tried and true for the best results. Read more...
Alloderm. Alloderm can be used in place of the patient own tissue to eliminate the donor site. Read more...

I have severely receding gums due to overbrushing-NOT gumdisease. Declined gum grafting. Oral health ok. How likely is it I will lose teeth due to this?

Gum Recession. When the gums recede, so does the bone, so your teeth have less support than others. The exposed roots may be more cavity prone, too. Meticulous oral hygiene and regular exams by a periodontist should allow you to preserve what bony support you have left. Read more...
Probably Not. I hav seen many cases of brushing caused problems but they tend to be localized. If you have gum recession see your dentist and perhaps a periodontist for an evaluation. Read more...
Unlikely. If you have gum recession I would recommend a high fluoride toothpaste and fluoride mouth rinse. Read more...
Uncommon/Unlikely. Tooth brush abrasion that leads to actual tooth loss is very rare. Switch to a soft toothbrush and when you begin brush try to start in a different are of the mouth each time. A consultation/exam with a periodontist would be a good idea. Soft tissue grafting could be an option if you are a good candidate for it. Intraoral pictures of the site to track the progress of the area would be a bad idea. Read more...

How is treating gum recession different for someone with disproportionately large teeth relative to the gums and mouth? Periodontists don't seem capable of helping me even after I had orthodontic treatment. Gum grafts never last for me.

Clenching. Could be a sign that you are clenching and or grinding your teeth. You should be evaluated by someone that treats TMJ Dysfunction, a simple night guard will not help with this problem but a properly designed orthotic can help. Read more...

Just recently had gum graft surgery, looks like my gums are still receding, worry that the graft didn't take, or is that normal?

Time for a follow up. Gum graft surgery can reduce the amount of recession and lessen the chance that gums will receed further in the future, but there is no guarantee that it will entirely eliminate what was already present. If you are not sure what you are seeing, schedule a follow up with the dentist or periodontist who did the procedure for you. Read more...
See the Surgeon. Without knowing exactly what was done and what it looked like before and now, including how long ago it was, we really can't give you an accurate answer. This question should be answered by the surgeon who actually performed the procedure. Read more...
Still healing. Although there are different types of "gum grafts", most of them receed slightly after the procedure is done. This is a normal healing process. However, you need to make sure that you follow the instructions after your surgery. Make sure that the sutures did not get loose, and be carefull not to brush the area vigorously. If you see bleeding or puss see your dentist immediately. Read more...