7 doctors weighed in:

Is a gluten-free diet a healthy alternative for someone that doesn't have celiac disease?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Certainly but....

... For children this is an unbelievably restricted diet.
It is very difficult to sdhere to.In a study where parents were asked whether medicine or the diet was effective, where both would work, the choice by the parents was the medicine by a clear margin.

In brief: Certainly but....

... For children this is an unbelievably restricted diet.
It is very difficult to sdhere to.In a study where parents were asked whether medicine or the diet was effective, where both would work, the choice by the parents was the medicine by a clear margin.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
Dr. Jill Carnahan
Family Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

There is a sizeable body of scientific evidence showing that grains, as well as legumes, contain anti-nutrients that may increase intestinal permeability and cause leaky gut and associated symptoms eliminating gluten-containing grains (and sugars) from your diet, while introducing traditionally fermented foods, can help prevent leaky gut as well as other chronic health conditions.

In brief: Yes

There is a sizeable body of scientific evidence showing that grains, as well as legumes, contain anti-nutrients that may increase intestinal permeability and cause leaky gut and associated symptoms eliminating gluten-containing grains (and sugars) from your diet, while introducing traditionally fermented foods, can help prevent leaky gut as well as other chronic health conditions.
Dr. Jill Carnahan
Dr. Jill Carnahan
Thank
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics

In brief: Yes, but unnecessary

People who have no ill symptoms and no allergy to gluten don't benefit from a gluten-free diet.
Gluten-free foods use grains such as corn, rice, millet, quinoa, and sorghum that don't have gluten, but such foods are more expensive and harder to find. However, healthy gluten-free foods are fine for anyone to eat, as long as they are part of a balanced diet.

In brief: Yes, but unnecessary

People who have no ill symptoms and no allergy to gluten don't benefit from a gluten-free diet.
Gluten-free foods use grains such as corn, rice, millet, quinoa, and sorghum that don't have gluten, but such foods are more expensive and harder to find. However, healthy gluten-free foods are fine for anyone to eat, as long as they are part of a balanced diet.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
46 years in practice
16M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors