Can toothpaste get rid of pimples?

Yes, drys it out ;.. Toothpaste and most other neutral ph. "clean" drying agents can "treat" the symptoms of acne pimples just like many otc acne treatments. Also, it is possible that the antibacterial agent triclosan found only in colgate total may have an additional minor therapeutic value as well.
No. Nothing has ever been scientifically proven or demonstrated! use tooth paste for your teeth--use other specific skin products for the pimples! good luck.

Related Questions

How can toothpaste help get rid of pimples?

Facial Mask. Toothpaste probably acts like a facial mask in that it dries out the infected area [use the paste not the gel]. In addition some toothpastes contain alcohol, or antibacterial compounds [i.e. Triclosan] which can kill bacteria. Do not leave it on your face overnight. Read more...
It does not. This is news to me, never heard this one before. Read more...

Can toothpaste get rid of your pimples?

Don't know. There may be a weak possibility that it will help., but ther are more appropriate/proven over-the-counter things (like clearasil) that are specific for skin-issues. Good luck. Read more...

Does toothpaste helo to get rid of pimples?

Maybe, try it. I'm not sure what the mode of action would be for most toothpastes, but a toothpaste called oxyfresh has chlorine dioxide as an active ingredient- this is very anti-bacterial, since it is the chemical pumped into senate office buildings to kill anthrax. Listerine could also help. Read more...
Not always! Certain pimples seem to shrink due to the anti inflammatory action of certain toothpastes that reduce gingival inflammation in the mouth. However, it is important to keep in mind that the dermis on the face and the oral mucosa have different cellular composition. Hence what's good for the mouth is not necessarily a cure for the skin. Chlorhexidine has proven to be a better solution... Read more...

Which toothpaste should I use to get rid of pimples?

None. Toothpaste is not used for pimples. It is used for cleaning teeth. Use a product specifically formulated for extra-oral use. Read more...
Not recommended. Using any toothpaste on a pimple can cause more redness and irritation. Please, save the toothpaste for your teeth only, and save your skin. Read more...
None. There are some salicylates in common tooth paste similar to that in acne face wash.However, the concentration and chemical balance is quite different. Use on pimples can cause chemical burns on your skin and permanent scarring.Use at your own risk.I would avoid it. Read more...

Could toothpaste get rid of your pimples?

NO. Do not use toothpaste on your face. It is more irritating than helpful. There are chemicals in toothpaste that can burn your skin and cause redness. Keep the toothpaste for your teeth. Read more...
Have heard this. I have heard this remedy before. It actually was probably used more in the old days when most toothpastes were all the same ingredients and makeup. Now, with all the different varieties of toothpastes and additives and claims, i would be very leery of what you place on face. Read more...

Since I had the pimple I've been using toothpaste to get rid of it, could that have been the cause of the lump?

Toothpaste for? Toothpaste is not intended to be used to "get rid of pimples". There are lot's of other products on the market that will probably work much better. Don't rely on what you read on the internet for alternative methods of treatment. If acne is a problem consult with MD. Can't diagnose cause of lump nor what lump is over the internet. Read more...

I put toothpaste on my pimple and it burnt my skin near the pimple. So now I have like a dark spot. How do you get rid of it?

Toothpaste. Never use toothpaste on your face to treat acne! The rare too many irritating chemicals in toothpaste that will hurt you. The dark spot will go away over time. Read more...
Irritant Dermatitis. Using any toothpaste for your acne can cause more redness and irritation. Please don't ever do this to your nose, save the toothpaste for your teeth only. If the irritation persists more than 10 days, please get it evaluated by your GP or dermatologist. Read more...