5 doctors weighed in:

How does sickle cell anemia lead you to potential osteomyelitis of the jaws?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Bone infarcts

In sickle cell anemia, there may be bone death, or infarction, with a crisis.
These infarctions render bones prone to infections, or osteomyelitis. These infections are most common in long bones, rather than the jaw, but may occur in any bone.

In brief: Bone infarcts

In sickle cell anemia, there may be bone death, or infarction, with a crisis.
These infarctions render bones prone to infections, or osteomyelitis. These infections are most common in long bones, rather than the jaw, but may occur in any bone.
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
Thank
Dr. Robert Warner
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology

In brief: Lack of oxygen

Sickle cell disease can cause tissues to receive inadequate oxygen to survive, most frequently by these red blood cells blocking the blood flow (and hence oxygen) in small blood vessels supplying tissues.
If tissue dies it is prone to become infected, and the bodies means of fighting infection is also compromised by the poor blood flow. Large joints are most common, but any tissue is at risk.

In brief: Lack of oxygen

Sickle cell disease can cause tissues to receive inadequate oxygen to survive, most frequently by these red blood cells blocking the blood flow (and hence oxygen) in small blood vessels supplying tissues.
If tissue dies it is prone to become infected, and the bodies means of fighting infection is also compromised by the poor blood flow. Large joints are most common, but any tissue is at risk.
Dr. Robert Warner
Dr. Robert Warner
Thank
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