Are vascular conditions a common complication of thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes. The thoracic outlet is notable for the presence of arteries, veins, and nerves. This outlet may be compressed to various degrees by various means (position, abnormal anatomy, tumor), impairing arterial blood supply to, or veinous drainage of, the arm. Also, there may be supply/drain complications to the brain. Symptoms include pain, swelling, numbness of the arm, and potentially lightheadedness.
Yes. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) can affect the nerves, arteries, or veins that travel from the chest into the arm that is affected. Although over 80% of TOS is neurogenic & only affects the nerves, 20% of TOS patients have vein damage that leads to blood clots or vein obstruction or artery narrowing that can also lead to chronic discomfort or numbness in the affecting arm or hand. See vascular MD.
Can be. Where arteries and veins exit the chest, there can be pressure on the arteries and veins with resulting narrowing of these vessels. Go to pubmed health to see full discussion.

Related Questions

Can poor circulation associated with thoracic outlet syndrome cause complications?

Depends. Depends on whether you are talking about true neurogenic as opposed to disputed neurogenic, venous or arterial thoracic outlet syndromes. Read more...
RISKS. If you have experienced artery or vein compression due to tos, and possess a cervical rib, there is risk of possible local blood clotting, and, on rare occasions, strokes have occurred. Since this can be very complex, and may be benign or more dangerous, best to have a very experienced thoracic outlet surgeon evaluate the blood vessels fully. Read more...

Is a second operation for thoracic outlet syndrome common?

TOS. TOS is complex and usually responds to physical therapy. Before surgery, multiple tests and physical therapy are done. If you continue with symptoms after a TOS operation, you may need more evaluation, possibly a second opinion before consenting to a second operation. Take a friend with you to consult. Be well. Read more...

What is the most common cause of thoracic outlet syndrome?

Narrow space. The most common cause is a narrow space between the first rib and a muscle tendon from the anterior scalene muscle. Other causes included an aberrent cervical rib. Read more...
Trauma. Many people are born with cervical ribs, elongated transverse vertebral processes, and narrow nerve tunnels in the spine and other areas of the body. Certain injuries can add to compression where nerves pass, and symptoms can ensue. Chronic activities overhead may result in tos issues, but an acute trauma seems more common. Read more...
Biomechanical Injury. Speculation of abnormal soft tissue scalene muscle structure wrong.  my clinic data proves cause is function of one cm space between bony clavicle and first rib (costoclavicular dimension), the true thoracic outlet for major arm artery and nerves; acromioclavicular joint laxity from acute injury and/or one shoulder drooped from unilateral thin/weak trapezius due to chronic head tilt (@ quora.Com). Read more...

Is it common to return to sports after surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

With care. 21yo male w. concern return to sport post-surgery for neurogenic Thoacic Outlet Syndrome, TOS. Aircraft mechanics, house painters & major league pitchers prone to TOS. Repetitive overhead work overdevelops muscles of inferior clavicle/scapula draw while superior trapezius, ST, loses mass & tone; leading to costoclavicular-clavicular dimension closure w. abduction. Solution: shrug exercises of ST. Read more...

Anyone out there ever treat thoracic outlet syndrome?

Thoracic outlet. This is from compression of brachial plexus from first rib first try physical therapy before first rib removal if diagnosis has been confirmed. Read more...
Yes. Physical therapy is the mainstay of treatment and sometimes surgery is necessary. Read more...
Yes. There are three major types. The most common is related to pain and nerve compression. This one responds to physical therapy sometimes. The other two types may involve the artery or vein. These are less common. The treatment can be a bit controversial, espescially the nerve compression type. See a surgeon experienced in thoracic outlet disease such as a vascular or cardiothoracic surgeon. Read more...