Related Questions

Does vitreous degeneration occur secondary to lattice degeneration of retina or do they occur independently, but together pose a risk of a future rd?

Separate. Lattice degeneration is an intra-retinal problem in which the retina lays down pigment to protect itself from stress at that point.. Vitreous degeneration is an older folks problem during which the gel vitreous over many years, turns into a dense syrupy liquid. Together they may increase slightly the risk of rd. Read more...

If more (enough) vitreous degeneration occurs before pvd, does the vitreous come off easier than usual with lesser risk of retinal tear?

Not known. This is not known. However it seems that characteristics of the retina have more to do with the occurrence of a retinal tear than the characteristics of the vitreous. That is, a thin myopic retina is more likely to tear than a thicker one. Read more...
Not really. The amount of vitreous liquification does not correlate with the risk of retinal tears. The vitreous liquified in or near the center and the collapses on itself and peels off the retinal surface. The tears occur if there is a spot where it is more stuck to the retina. Think perking tape off of paper, the paper may tear where outbid "too" stuck fown during the peeling. Hope this helps. Read more...

Hi, I am 23 male, Diagnosed with Vitreous Degeneration, suffering from floaters, Retina is Healthy with 6/6 vision. Is it common for my age?

Depends. It is rare in 20's but it's more common around 50's. However, younger patient could have vitreous Degenration if they are myopic, history of trauma to the eye or to the head, or history of eye surgery. It could be genetic too. The vitreous ages with time and liquefies and becomes mobile. The changes can cause floater or flashes. If it's a new episode then the person needs eye exam. Read more...

Is there any drug to reduce vitreo-retinal traction and adhesion? Can they be used during posterior vitreous detachment to prevent retinal tears?

Not at this time. This is no drug or treatment at this time. It must go through the natural process. Read more...
No. In the absence of retinal inflammation or uveitis, there are no oral or topical drugs which decrease vitreo-retinal traction. If their is inflammation in the eye, the cause of this needs to be discovered and treated appropriately. There is no drug that you can take while a posterior vitreal detachment is occurring. You should be checked for the presence of significant retinal breaks. Read more...

What is "vitreous base traction" and why do some articles say it can lead to retinal redetachment even after a successful repair by vitrectomy?

Vitreous strands. The vitreous even after vitrectomy , can sometimes form stands and bands which have contractile or elastic properties. These can connect two opposite sites in the back of the eye, one being the retina, and as they contract, they can elevate the retina causing a detachment. This may require further surgery. Read more...

To an eyemd for review of lattice degeneration - no tear/hole, a bit of traction. Since symptomatic (only floaters), suggested b/l barrage. Go for it?

Yes. If there is indeed traction with floaters, i would consider getting laser retinopexy as recommended, even though there are no holes or tears. You could consider a second opinion by another retinal specialist. Read more...
Retinal traction. Hello again. If retinal traction, important concerns are where the traction is, for example above or below, and whether you have any history of retinal holes or tears in the past, or if anyone in your family has, as well. Treatment is individualized for the patient. Sometimes treatment is needed, sometimes not. Read more...