Can deep vein thrombosis or embolus kill you?

DVT. A deep vein thrombosis usually arises from the veins in the leg. If a fragment or the entire clot dislodges, it can travel to the right side of the heart, either blocking blood flow in the heart or the clot can travel the pulmonary artery to the lungs, where it can block the flow of blood to the entire lung or a portion thereof. The phenomenon of embolism to heart or lungs can be fatal.
Yes. A clot that develops in the deep veins of the upper legs can break loose and go through the heart and lodge in the lungs and cause death. Pulmonary embolus.
Yes. A deep vein thrombosis or DVT is a clot in the deep veins. This usually refers to the legs but can certainly occur elsewhere. If a DVT breaks off and travels through the blood stream it could end up in the lungs. This is a pulmonary embolus and this can be lethal. Treatment is with anti coagulation. Sometimes we are asked to place a filter in the vena cava to prevent pulmonary embolus.

Related Questions

Is operation the only option for deep vein thrombosis with pulmonory embolism?

Depends. Surgical treatment is usually reserved for massive pulmonary embolism (pe) or in chronic pe cases. In most instances DVT and pe are treated with clot dissolving drugs (thrombolysis) and blood thinners (anticoagulation). Sometimes DVT is treated "invasively" by an interventional radiologist to help direct the therapy to the clot directly. Read more...
Treatment DVT and PE. Operation is not the only option for DVT and PE and is usually NOT an option. Most DVT/PE is treated by anticoagulation. Some extensive DVT is treated by clot desolving through a process called lysis using "clot busters". Life threatening PE may be treated by surgery but this is only in an extreme circumstance. Most DVT and PE are treated by medical means. Read more...

Could I have a pulmonary embolism as a result of deep vein thrombosis?

Yes. Pulmonary embolism is the most serious consequence of a deep vein thrombosis but is an uncommon occurrence. Read more...
Yes. About 1 in 10 deep venous thromboses end up causing pulmonary emboli. Although rare, they can be fatal. Unfortuately pulmonary emboli can be silent and cause no symptoms. Some symptoms include chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, and a fast pulse. If you have a DVT and any of these symptoms, you should go to an emergency room. Read more...

What is someone surviving deep-vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism?

Many. There are many who have survived and have done well with anticoagulation or filter use to prevent further enlarging pe. Read more...

Are there any connections between the deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism?

Cause and effect. Deep vein thrombosis is a blood clot that forms in the veins, often in the legs, but also in other places. If a clot breaks loose and travels to the lungs, it is called pulmonary embolism. A pulmonary embolism can be fatal. Read more...
Definately. Deep venous thrombosis or DVT is a blood clot in one of the deep veins of the legs. The deep vein system lies in the center of the leg in between the major muscles. It connects with the large return vein in the pelvis (vena cava) which drains into the right heart. This leads to the lungs. Thus these clots can lodge in the lungs and be life threatening. Dvt is initially treated by blood thinners. Read more...

Is there a connection between the deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism?

Absolutely. When a person gets a deep venous thrombosis (dvt), part of the thrombus (blood clot) can break off and travel to the lungs. This is what we call a pulmonary embolism (pe). Although it has been shown that it is possible to form a pe without having a DVT first, it is felt that this is a very uncommon occurrence. Far more commonly, a pe will start out as a DVT in one or both legs. Read more...
Yes. Thrombus (clot) within the deep veins of the legs, arms, and pelvis may travel to the pulmonary arteries in the lungs and cause pulmonary embolism. Read more...

How to tell if it's deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism? What are the major differences?

Can be the same. In some patients a DVT leads to pe. In other patient they have one or the other. A DVT is a clot in the deep veins such as the legs, or veins in the pelvis with associated swelling of the legs. A pe is clot in the pulmonary artery in the lung and could be associated with chest pain, shortness of breath, passing out as well as coughing or wheezing. Read more...
Multiple . Dvt deep vein thrombus is in deep veins of arms, pelvis or legs. Rarely intra cardiac. Pulmonary embolism is a thrombus that moves from somewhere to the lungs. Read more...

Can there be any connection between the deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism?

Yes. Deep vein thrombosis in the iliac, femoral and popliteal venous system of the legs are the most common site of formation of blood clot. When pieces or entire bulk of clot dislodges from the leg deep vein, it travels from there through the vena cava to the right side of the heart. From the right atrium, the right ventricle pumps it out the the pulmonary artery and one now has a pulmonary embolus. Read more...
Absolutely. Most of the thrombi( clots) that go to lung- pulmonary, originate in pelvic or leg veins as dvt. Read more...
Yes very much. They are highly connected. A deep vein thrombosis [ dvt] is clot in the deep tissue usually the legs. If part of the clot breaks off it will travel to the lungs and cause a pulmonary embolism. [ pe]. To put it another way : pe's pulmonary emboli come from broken off parts of dvts. Read more...

If I had pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis, would I know it or are they "silent killers"?

Generally not. Silent and symptoms such as pain, swelling and shortness of breath would be present. Read more...
Need evaluation. Dvt is characterized usually by unilateral leg swelling either from the calf down or thigh down depending on the localization of the clot. Associated symptoms are pain and tenderness in the leg and sometimes increased heat. Pulmonary embolism is usually associated with shortness of breath or fatigue. A venous ultrasound, d-dimer blood test and , chest ct would be the indicated tests. Read more...

How can I best prevent pulmonary embolism if I had a deep vein thrombosis?

Need to discuss. This with your doctor. You need to be on blood thinner for at least 6 months. Also have your blood checked to see if it is too thick. Some patients also need an ivc filter ( see radiologyinfo.Org). Read more...
See below. Follow your doctor's advice and take your blood thinner as prescribed. To prevent further episodes, eliminate risk factors such as smoking, medicines that may predispose to clots (ask your doctor), premedicate with blood thinner before long flights, travel or other immobility, and if you are a woman and plan to get pregnant, make sure you consult high-risk doctors. Read more...