Do doctors, during surgery really remove a rib to treat thoracic outlet syndrome?

Yes. Thoracic out let syndrome is caused by narrowing of the space in the chest that contains the nerves (brachial plexus) and arteries (axillary artery and veins). Sometimes an extra rib, called the cervical rib narrows the space. Usually it is the 1st rib and the anterior scalene muscle. Surgery to remove the 1st rib and the ant scalene muscle can help with symptoms.
Yes, sometimes. Usually the rib is not the problem. The problem is scarring and tightness in the muscles attached to the rib. This can be treated by removing the muscles thru a neck incision and leaving the rib or removing it, depending on the findings at surgery. Some doctors remove the rib through the arm pit in order to release the muscles attached to it. Through the arm pit, the rib must be removed.

Related Questions

Do surgeons leave a part of the first rib during surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome or do they remove the whole thing?

TOS. The removal of the first rib is a fairly involved procedure, but results are frequently highly gratifying. In my experience the entire rib is excised. Read more...

Is surgery needed for thoracic outlet syndrome due to a first rib fracture?

Surgical interventio. If there is evidence of SEVERE vessel compromise which cuts off the circulation to your arm (rare cases patients can see severe discoloration to the digits-nearly gangrene appearance), then a vascular surgeon will operate. Otherwise, they will want you to complete a course of PT with strengthening of your shoulder girdle muscles before going to more aggressive measures. Read more...

Having a hard time finding any success stories for people who have had a rib resected for thoracic outlet syndrome. Does this surgery work?

Difficult diagnosis. I question the diagnosis! Go for second opinion with an academic practioner. Read more...
Yes. But not always 100%. Discuss with your Thorasic Surgeon his success rate. I would first try a vigorous course of PT and Exercises prior to Surgery Also read the medical literature rather than Googling it. Try WebMD/Medscape and the National Medical Library. Read more...
Yes. You are not looking hard enough. The first line of treatment is physical therapy, followed by life style modification, weight loss, etc. Surgery is a time tested therapy which has improved over time, and carries excellent results. Read more...

What kind of doctor should I see to get evaluated for thoracic outlet syndrome? Chronic r arm/shoulder pain ×6yrs. 3 wrist/arm surgeries no relief.

TOS. You could try a neurologist or orthopedic surgeon...But generally best managed by a thoracic surgeon (heart surgeon). Not all thoracic surgeons manage thoracic outlet though so you must ask around. Good luck. Read more...
VASCULAR SURGEON. In most parts of usa, the experts in tos come from vascular surgery backgrounds, but a few of us neurologists also deal with this. Places to go include ucla, psl in denver, washingon univ in st louis, johns hopkins univ, and perhaps univ of vancouver. Maybe best bet is to phone dr richard sanders at 303-388-6461, and get further information. Read more...

How risky is surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome?

Somewhat. Risks include: injury to arteries and veins injury to the nerve failure to accomplish goals of therapy pain. Read more...
Always surgical risk. Modern tos surgery is relatively safe, with good success rates, but surgery is not always perfect. Complication rates have dropped dramatically over the past years, but rarely, post-op pain, scapular winging, diaphagmatic elevation, increased arm weakness, and even local bleeding may present. Most of this is readily reversible. The risk of anesthesia is extremely low these days. Read more...

Can thoracic outlet syndrome be treated if the nerve compression has been for 8 month, or surgery is necessary? And how much time does physicalT take

Yes. 20y seeks non-operative therapy of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Neurovascular bundle impingement occurs in costo-clavicular dimension, the true Thoracic Outlet. Impingement is due to irregular clavicle motion w. abduction; caused by abnormal superior trapezius, ST, function; via ST overdeveloped or underdeveloped relative to muscles of inferior scapular draw, i.e., "crossed muscles". See a wise P.T. Read more...

What could cause really bad back pain after surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome?

It's up in the air.- -has nothing to do with your surgery. Some people get a sore back from lying in bed 2 long. Otherwise see your PCP & go from there. . Read more...

Does surgery really only help 50-70% of people with thoracic outlet syndrome?

85%-90% success. These results suggest that surgical decompression can alleviate pain and quality of life in patients with a wide range of abnormalities at the thoracic outlet. Read more...