3 doctors weighed in:

How successful is surgery in the treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Karen Sibert
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Quite successful

Surgery to remove the first rib (or an extra rib, if there), and break up any fibrous bands of tissue is successful in relieving symptoms in up to 80% of patients.
Additional treatment to widen blood vessels (angioplasty) or even bypass compressed blood vessels is sometimes necessary. Even with surgery, symptoms may recur in a small percentage of patients.

In brief: Quite successful

Surgery to remove the first rib (or an extra rib, if there), and break up any fibrous bands of tissue is successful in relieving symptoms in up to 80% of patients.
Additional treatment to widen blood vessels (angioplasty) or even bypass compressed blood vessels is sometimes necessary. Even with surgery, symptoms may recur in a small percentage of patients.
Dr. Karen Sibert
Dr. Karen Sibert
Thank

In brief: Great question

Important that you have a full evaluation, with both scalene and pectoralis minor blocks.
If "neurogenic", an EMG including direct and indirect measurements of the lower brachial plexus. Correctly screened patients can have close to 85-90% successful surgical outcomes with experienced surgeons.

In brief: Great question

Important that you have a full evaluation, with both scalene and pectoralis minor blocks.
If "neurogenic", an EMG including direct and indirect measurements of the lower brachial plexus. Correctly screened patients can have close to 85-90% successful surgical outcomes with experienced surgeons.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
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