How successful is surgery in the treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome?

Quite successful. Surgery to remove the first rib (or an extra rib, if there), and break up any fibrous bands of tissue is successful in relieving symptoms in up to 80% of patients. Additional treatment to widen blood vessels (angioplasty) or even bypass compressed blood vessels is sometimes necessary. Even with surgery, symptoms may recur in a small percentage of patients.
Great question. Important that you have a full evaluation, with both scalene and pectoralis minor blocks. If "neurogenic", an EMG including direct and indirect measurements of the lower brachial plexus. Correctly screened patients can have close to 85-90% successful surgical outcomes with experienced surgeons.

Related Questions

Is there a chance that surgery won't help neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome? If so how often does this happen?

Yes. Unfortunately, it is possible that it will not help but that goes for any surgery. The question is best answered by the surgeon himself. Read more...

What is recovery like after surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome?

Piece of cake -- it will be ok -- if your doctor told you you needed the surgery then get it done and you will find relief of symptoms pain and numbness of your upper limb immediately. Read more...

Will I need to have surgery to correct my thoracic outlet syndrome?

Possibly. As mentioned, surgery may be needed if conservative approaches fail. However, in my former rehab group, about 85% of tos pts responded fully to conservative measures, and never even saw a surgeon. Surgery would be critical if you have blood vessel compression especially associated with a cervical rib, and is often considered if pain is unremitting and associated with prog. Numb and weak hand. Read more...

Is thoracic outlet syndrome permanent? What if you get the surgery?

If the symptoms. were caused entirely by compression and damage is still reversible, surgery should be curative. Consult with a thoracic surgeon or vascular surgeon. Read more...

How are moderns results for surgery for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

TSO is caused by- -pressure from outside of the nerves, it is not a neurological disease. Just like CTS is caused from pressure from outside of the nerve, not a neurological disease intrinsic to the median nerve. . Read more...

I may have started exercising too early after thoracic outlet syndrome surgery and don't feel well with back an neck pain. What should I do?

Stop exercising... I suggest you stop exercising, including weight control, at least for now, until you have the opportunity to follow-up with your surgeon. Your surgeon can give you the best idea as to when you can safely begin exercising again. You can apply ice or heat to the area (whichever feels better) and take acetaminophen or ibuprofen for the discomfort. But, if symptoms worsen, go to the ER for treatment! Read more...