I have a weak grip, tingling in my fingers and pain in my neck. Do I have thoracic outlet syndrome?

Thoracic Outlet. You may or you may not. There are numerous conditions that can cause these symptoms. You should consult with your doctor about this problem.
Maybe. But only one of many possibilities, and would first consideration carpal tunnel syndrome or cubital tunnel syndrome, with pinched nerve in neck another consideration. MRI of neck, and EMG of neck, plexus and arm should pin this down quite well.
Maybe. While these are some of the symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome, it takes a more complete history to make that diagnosis.

Related Questions

I may have started exercising too early after thoracic outlet syndrome surgery and don't feel well with back an neck pain. What should I do?

Stop exercising... I suggest you stop exercising, including weight control, at least for now, until you have the opportunity to follow-up with your surgeon. Your surgeon can give you the best idea as to when you can safely begin exercising again. You can apply ice or heat to the area (whichever feels better) and take acetaminophen or ibuprofen for the discomfort. But, if symptoms worsen, go to the ER for treatment! Read more...

Developed scapular winging & grinding 2 yrs ago. It progressed and now have severe pain in neck and have thoracic outlet syndrome. Any theories?

Cervical rib. In 22 year old, no history of neck trauma, cervical rib, anomalous first rib, or congenital band compressing brachial plexus is most likely cause. Long thoracic nerve compression can cause winged scapula, which is rare with cervical rib, but could occur. Plain neck x-ray for rib abnormality is next step. If there is neck trauma, scalene scarring can explain winged scapula and tos symptoms. Read more...

Should I get a cervical epidural to r/o spine issues after getting diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome? Thinking I should get no relief in neck/shoulder...

No- epidural steroid. Injection is not a diagnostic test but a treatment . You need to have a physician who is knowledgable about both conditions evaluate you and the appropriate studies for both regions and determine the exact cause or causes of your symptoms. An orthopedic surgeon may be a good specialist to choose. Read more...
Yes. Tos is a provisional diagnosis of exclusion, if you want to exclude cervical radiculopathy which overlaps significantly with tos then i, njections are needed surgical outcomes of tos have not been excellent surgical outcomes for cervical radiculopathy are great good luck. Read more...
Why do this? Indication for cervical epidural injection in presence of nerve compression due to disk or other lesions. Not a helpful test for thoracic outlet syndrome, which can be confirmed by ultrasound, EMG of plexus, or even angiographic studies. Read more...

Does thoracic outlet syndrome also include lower facial tingling?

No. CN 7. The platysma is innervated by the cervical branch of the facial nerve see any number seven. Thoracic outlet syndrome affects the brachioplexus which is more peripheral location. Read more...
No. The thoracic outlet syndrome it self was found not a appropriate diagnosis most of the time. Lower facial is innervated by C2-3 nerve root, thoracic outlet syndrome usually bothering the nerves innervated by C8-t1. Read more...
Usually not. But if consistent symptom relationship, might wonder about a lesion in the brainstem or upper spinal canal instead. Read more...

Current diagnosis is thoracic outlet syndrome. 8 months ago I had 2 cort. Trigger point injctns. (where neck meets shoulder)-got 2 days full relief. Normal?

Injections. If your symptoms where relieved by only two trigger point injx you dont have tos be thankful.'tos is a diagnosis of exclusion of a collection of subjective sensations with clinical overlap with a number of other similar syndromes result after injx implies active trigger points as diagnosis. Read more...
Correlation. Often adds further evidence of presence of pathology inferior to the scalene muscles, and may support in part, a diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. Often find that pts who respond well to such an injection, are real good candidates for successful conservative or surgical interventions. Read more...

If scapular instability is the cause of thoracic outlet syndrome, would rib resection/scalenectomy resolve neck & scapula pain?

More complex. Thoracic outlet syndrome surgery includes, often, first rib resection and/or scalenectomy, but there are different surgical approaches and also, pectoralis minor decompressions. Scapular instability may or may not be present, and this may represent problems in the upper brachial plexus. Since this is so individualized and particular in most cases, best to discuss with experienced vascular surg. Read more...