Is heat therapy effective for treating Achilles tendonitis / tendonosis?

Sometimes. If you have tendinitis - icing is best to help decrease inflammation as well as NSAID medication (i.e. Ibuprofen, naprosyn). Heat may help "loosen up" the tissue prior to therapy/exercises. Icing should be resumed post exercise to again decrease inflammation.
Not really. Superficial heat packs don't heat the tissues deep enough to be effective in achilles tendon issues. Deep heating modalities such as ultrasound or mds laser therapy are more effective. Daily stretching and electrical stimulation may be helpful as well.

Related Questions

What are treatment options for Achilles tendonitis?

Stretching and PT. Stretching and pt have been the most effective for most of the patients i see. I have not seen good scientific evidence supporting prolotherapy for this or any other condition. Read more...

I've got Achilles tendonitis. What is the best treatment for this?

Achilles Tendonitis. Rest! achilles tendinitis which is stretching the tendon where it inserts on the heel. Try wearing a heel lift in your shoe or a slight heel to relax the tendon from its insertion. Ice, rest, topical irritants like icy hot or bengay can help too. If it doesn't get better visit your local podiatrist for further evaluation and treatment. Possible need to ankle brace, walking boot or therapy. Read more...
The best... ...Is the one that works for you. Tendonitis can get better or worse despite any therapy. That said, I do not agree with the standard treatments. You want to increase blood flow to the feet (daily hot soaks and warm socks), and stimulate your circulation while limiting pain with skin brushing twice a day. Braces and ice with chronic tendonitis seem counterproductive. Read more...

If I have Achilles tendonitis, what would be good treatment to try?

Stretching. Stretching of the calf muscles frequently(5-7 times per day) is the most effective treatment I have seen in my patients. Read more...
Several. Rest, ice, compression, elevation. Also try a lift in your shoe, under the heel to remove pressure from the achilles tendon. Read more...
Other suggestions. I have been dealing with this condition myself for over five years, which was refractory to stretches, heel lifts, anti-inflammatories, and eccentric strengthening. Newer treatments including ultrasounded guided tenotomy & prp really helped me. People are also now using stem cell treatments. Read more...

Best treatment for inflammed Achilles tendonitis that has become acute for over 18 months?

Rest and Ice Therapy. Achilles tendonitis can be frustrating! rest, avoid aggravating activity, use aggressive ice therapy, gentle stretching and anti-inflammatory rx. Consider a podiatry visit / orthotics / even immobilization. Consider physical therapy and ultrasound. Lastly, note that certain medications can be harmful to the tendon such as quinolone antibiotics (eg: cipro) and steroids. Read more...
Achilles tendonitis. Persistent discomfort more than 6 weeks is consider chronic. In your case you may need physical therapy, x-ray or mri, maybe referral to ortho. We want to avoid rupture, and gradually improve your symptoms. Read more...
It Depends! First, one has to differentiate between insertional and noninsertional achilles tendonitis, ie is the problem in the midsubstance of the tendon or where in attatches to the heel? The treatment is different depending on the type other than both need modification of activities to avoid overuse, heel lift, icing, anti-inflammatories and comfortable shoewear that doesn't rub the affected area. Ortho. Read more...

Which treatment works the best and fastest for Achilles tendonitis?

No good answer. There really is not a best answer for this. What works well and fast for you might not for the next patient. In general, injections work faster than medications or pt, but also incur higher risks. Steroid injections have a risk of causing rupture of the tendon, while prp, a newer treatment, may take days or a few weeks to see the full benefit. Read more...
PT. Avoiding the painful activity. Ice, antiinflammatories, stretching. Physical therapy. This can take time to heal. Be patient, and it will pay off later. Read more...

Why is it that an Achilles tendonitis is not responding to treatment?

What treatment? What type of treatment are you undergoing? Achilles "tendinitis" is responsive to eccentric loading physical therapy and radial shock wave therapy. Rarely, neither of these work and an invasive procedure such as breisment or surgery is needed. Read more...

What is the treatment for Achilles tendonitis?

Achilles tendinitis. Tendinitis refers to an acute condition lasting less than 6 weeks. Treatments include relative rest, antiinflammatory meds, icing, then progressive strengthening prior to returning to full activity. If it has been present for greater than 6 weeks probably represents tendinosis or disease of the tendon. Txment for that is an eccentric loading program, small heel lift, or regenerative injections. Read more...

Achilles tendinitis is killing me. 3 sessions of ESW therapy didn't help either. What to do?

Achilles pain. There are many other options it really depends on severity of tendinitis and location. I recommend an MRI to truly evaluate degree and review options with your podiatrist. Read more...
Stop hurting it. Achilles tendonitis can be a very frustrating condition to treat. The speed of improvement is slower than the patient is willing to wait on. So many times, the inflammation is treated and not the cause of the inflammation process. The idea is to get more blood to the tendon without adding more injury. I find the best way is moist heat applied to the area and often. Use a Cam walker for protection. Read more...

When treating Achilles tendinitis, best schedule for ice therapy and stretching?

Not that simple. Treatment for achilles tendinitis varies with the location of the pain along the tendon, the duration, the cause, and your activity level. Giving you a "schedule" for stretching not knowing these factors would be unwise. In addition, the achilles has a poor blood supply. If you have injured this, ice may actually delay the healing process. Please have this examined by a specialist. Read more...