Are dental implants always  painfull?

NO WAY. In most cases dental implants are not painful at all! in our practice most dental implant patients do not require any pain medicine other than over the counter tylenol (acetaminophen) or advil. Often times, the dental extraction is by far more uncomfortable than a dental implant.
Seldomly so... Implant placement can cause pain when there is: -Aggressive site preparation and/or lack of adequate irrigation resulting in the "burning" of the bone. -Impingement of biologic structures (Nerve/Sinus perforation), which can be solved by getting a CT scan. -Improper pain management. I've placed over 150 implants. No complaints yet. The above issues are not a problem for most. Good luck.
No. There is no pain in placement of a dental implant as the patient is anesthetized. Post-operative, the patient may experience post-op discomfort, however is usually minimal and well controlled with medication.
Pain with implants. Unfortunately, all patients are different! clinicians can claim "this surgery" or "that procedure" is "painless", but it's never a way to start a relationship. Incisions are made, and bone is prepared (ie drilled), so there is always some pain. In most cases routine pain meds (nsaids or hydrocodone) relieves it just fine. Patients led to believe anything is "painless" are often unhappy patients.
Dental implants. Every body is different. Pain usually is worse in the first 3 days (more in the first 24 hours). This is something you need to talk to your oral surgeon who placed the implant, they are good at this.
No. Most often dental implants are not painful. The surgery is usually very predictable and results in very little discomfort. Bone does not contain nerves, so the work done in the bone does not cause pain. There is minimal to no swelling, if proper post-operative protocols are followed and the proper medication(s) are prescribed and taken as directed.
Shouldn't be. It might be a little uncofortable soon after getting your implant placed in your mouth. But ut that doesn't last long. When I had mine put in...No pain at all except for where the shots were given. After you get your teeth on the implant might be a little sore since there hasn't been any biting sensation in the area for some time. But that can be adjusted. So pain should be minimal.
NO. When a dental implant is placed the dentist should have you on certain medications. This helps to keep pain to a "soreness" since a wound is being created. An antibiotic for one week starting the day before the procedure and anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofin. Some dentists like myself use a steroidal medicine also to keep pain and swelling to a very minimum.
Not at all! Dental implants are placed as a minor surgical procedure and there is almost always a minor pain component involved with any surgery. I have had 2 implants placed in me, one in an extraction site the same day and another in a grafted site. I only required Motrin for a day or two to be comfortable. Only the most extensive reconstructive implant cases would probably be a little more uncomfortable!
Relatively painless. Fortunately, modern anesthetics allow dental implant placement to be done virtually pain-free. The actual procedure should be virtually pain-free and worry free.
A little sometimes. To place an implant we need to perform little surgery, of course the is going to be a little discomfort that can be treated with pain medication for less than a week, aftr athat no pain at all.
Rarely very much. Typically the pain associated with dental implant surgery is from the gum tissue manipulation and the injection sites. The implant placed in bone creates almost no pain initially or later. Most patients use only Ibuprofen for pain management, unless an entire arch is treated, then they may use something stronger for a few days.Many of my patients go back to work that day or the next.Think positive.
No. It is unusual to have intense pain after the procedure. Often patients may have some discomfort for 1-2 days if at all.
No! Dental implant treatment is generally not painful, if properly performed under good local and I.V. Anesthesia. Many patients never take any pain medicine, because they're not having any pain. If there is pain present, there may be a problem, such as an infection or a failing implant. Implants that are properly integrated into the jaw are completely pain-free. You shouldn't feel them at all.

Related Questions

Do dental implants work?

Usually. It depends on many factors, but they generally have better than 90% success long term in human mouths. Read more...
Absolutely. Dental implants have actually been around much longer than most people realize. They are a great treatment option, and when done properly, they have a very high success rate. Read more...
Yes. While not always possible, implants are highly succesful . Conservative to other teeth as opposed to shaping adjacent teeth to fit a bridge. Very helpful in supporting loose dentures as well. Read more...
Yes. If done correctly they work very well. Studies on 10-year survival rates are greater than 90%. Read more...
Usually. Dental implants are no different from any other therapeutic methodology: sometimes they work, and sometimes they don't. The most important factor in their success is case selection-- that is, using them when they're appropriate, and not using them when another approach to tooth replacement is more advantageous. When properly implemented, implants are one additional worthy tool in the toolbox. Read more...
YES ! . Dental implants have been around for over 50 years. Today -the success rate of dental implants is 95-98%. Dental implants do work. We can replace one missing tooth or the whole mouth, so you can have permanent teeth and enjoy food and have quality of life you deserve. Read more...
Yes. They work very well and they can change your life and smile. It is the best treatment available to replace a missing tooth or teeth. Read more...
Amazingly Well! Dental implants can truly replace teeth that have been lost. When teeth are missing, this places more force and pressure on the other remaining teeth and can accelerate their demise. The most important thing about dental implants is don't let anyone put the implant in, until the dentist who is building the teeth (the cosmetic dentist) says you are ready. Read more...
Yes. The literature is replete with high success rates. What's nice is dental implants, unlike other prosthesis i.e.. Hips knees etc. Most often do not need to be replaced later on in life. Read more...
Yes! Not only are implants often more appealing cosmetically, they help to preserve your natural bone levels. Implants look and feel more like your natural teeth than dental bridges or partial dentures and they last a lifetime! as far as "working", the answer is yes. When is comes to my patients' overall functionality, they never even notice the difference. Read more...
Absolutely. Dental implants are amazing. My office has been successfully placing and restoring them for over 20 years. Our oldest patient to have them placed was 93 years old at the time and at 94 she is functioning normally. They are one of the most predictable procedures dentist can preform and the patient are among the happiest! an individual can be transformed from a dental cripple to fully functional! Read more...
Very well. The success rate is in the upper 90's. What else has that kind of rate ? All situations are different, but it is generally a safe and predictable procedure with tremendous benefits. Read more...
YES! Dental implants are actually the most successful procedure an oral surgeon performs today. With a 95-99% success rate according to studies, there are few complications. Even a tooth extraction has a higher complication rate. If performed correctly by a properly trained surgeon and restored correctly, a dental implant should last you a lifetime. Read more...
YES! One of the most successful treatments, and longest lasting, services are dental implants. Read more...
Yes. Dental implants are amongst the most successful dental procedure today. I would not have a reservation about getting them. Read more...
Definitely ! Of course they work... But contrary to routine beliefs, they need more periodontal care than natural teeth, and simply because the structure of gum support and attachments to titanium dental implants are completely different than of natural teeth. Implants are more vulnerable to oral and periodontal bacteria, hence more sensitive , periodontally. Read more...
YES. Dental implants, like everything else in life, is not made to last forever. Done properly they can last for more than 15 years. If you take diligent care of the implant it could conceivably last much, much longer. Read more...
MOST SUCCESSFUL! . With poor national averages of crowns, veneers and "white" fillings lasting under a decade and most orthodontic cases relapsing the moment patients stop wearing their retainers, i am pleased that well placed implants, once integrated with the supporting bone structure, can last a lifetime. Most failures associated with implants are the restorative crowns, loosening screws, or leftover cement. Read more...
Dental Implants work. Yes they work very well. After integrating into the bone and after one year , the success rate is in the 99% at 17 years. Always have a doctor who has a minimum of 1 years' of post doctoral training in doing and restoring them. Ask for their credentials. They should be happy to provide this. Read more...
Yes. Implants are the second most successful procedure in dentistry. The only procedure more successful is tooth extraction, which is, of course, 100% successful. If you are missing one tooth, an implant-supported crown is an ideal restoration since it corrects the problem without involving adjacent teeth. Implants also replace removable appliances with anchored dentistry that functions much better. Read more...
Hope so. I sure hope so since I am in the process of getting them for myself. Read more...
Artificial root. Implants are an artificial root that is placed in the bone to have a crown attached to it to replace a missing tooth. Ask a cabinet maker how a metal insert is placed in wood to secure a screw. Read more...
Yes. As long as you have enough healthy bone, dental implants provide a long-term replacement for missing teeth. Most implant patients will tell you implants are the next best thing to having your own natural teeth. Read more...
Absolutely . Dental implants are very successful! The newer materials and implant systems have about a 98% success rate on healthy individuals. Smoking and diabetes are the main cause of implant failures. If you are a non smoker, not a diabetic and your bone is healthy it will most likely work for you. See a dentist and have them evaluate you. It's a great way to replace missing teeth! Best of luck! Read more...
Yes! The simple answer is, “Yes!” Our patients frequently tell us that their implants feel so real; it would be easy to forget they aren’t natural teeth. Fortunately, there are no dietary restrictions or special care instructions to remember. Implants function just like real teeth, and they need the same care. As a wonderful bonus, the crowns, bridges, or dentures can be made to look just like real tee. Read more...
95-98% Success Rate. dental implants have a average success rate of 97%. The odds decrease with smokers and diabetics. Certain patients are not good candidates if they are taking a class of medication known as bisphospahtes (i.e. Atenenol, Bovina) Read more...
Absolutely! Dental implants are effective in restoring missing teeth to full form, health, function and esthetics in the majority of cases. See you Dentist for an implant consultation, to see if implants would be best for your particular situation. Good Luck!! Read more...
Sure. Have been used for decades. Speak to your dentist regarding your options. Read more...
Yes. Closest in function to natural teeth. Best option for the replacement of missing teeth. Read more...
Implants do work! When done properly, dental implants are a very predictable and highly successful procedure. Make sure you see a dentist, whether it is a general dentist, a periodontist or an oral surgeon who has experience in the placement of implants. Also, it is often a much less traumatic procedure than tooth extraction. Good luck! Read more...
Of course. Implants have a documented success rate of over 95%, which is significantly higher than any other tooth-replacement option. Read more...
Implants. Dental implants are incredibly successful! They have between a 95-98% success rate, and enable us to provide treatment that simply didn't exist 20 years ago. They work extremely well, and can make a huge difference in your appearance, how you speak, and how you eat. Read more...
Absolutely. Implants definitely work. The key to long-term success is finding a quality person to place the implants. Unfortunately today, many people are placing implants that are unqualified or do not have enough experience. My advice to you would be to find a quality periodontist in your area who is been practicing for approximately 5 to 10 years at minimum. Read more...
Success. Implants have a high success rate of around 95% independent of the manufacturer. But success is also dependent on the patient doing good home care to prevent gum problems around them. Read more...
Absolutely. Success depends upon multiple factors, the two most important being the skills of the various practitioners involved and appropriate maintenance by the patient. Implants are safe, cost effective, and state of the art. Read more...

Can anyone have dental implants?

Depends. It depends how much bone you have and where nerves, sinuses, etc. Are in relation to the level of the bone. Best thing to do is go to a specilaist that places implants and they willlet you know if you are a candidate or not. Read more...
Implants. Almost everyone. Evaluation of the medical history, radiographs to evaluate bone, review of medications and to see if the patient has any medical complications. Quality of the bone and ability for bone to heal are key. Read more...
Usually Yes! Dental implants work very well, depending on the health of the individual. The success rate drops with smokers and certain diseases such as diabetes, but discuss this with your dentist or oral surgeon, and they can give you the answer based on your health. Read more...
Almost anyone. Contraindications are insufficient bone, nerve position, heavy smoker, and others. Read more...
Most. Almost anyone who is healthy or has well controlled medical problems can successfully have dental implants. Read more...
Generally Yes. If a particular individual is relatively healthy and has enough bone hieght and width in the particular area, dental implants are the best treatment choice in replacing missing or lost teeth. Sometimes it can even be done immediately when a hopeless tooth is remove the same day! Read more...
Yes, almost. With today's technology it is possible to place implants in anybody even if there us insufficient bone. With bone grafting techniques, short implants, tilted implants and biological modifiers and growth factors it is physically possible. Today I am able to offer implants to anybody. The only reason I do not place implants is if the patient has one of a handful of medical conditions. Read more...
Pretty much so. Unless you have an overriding disease or condition that would prevent localized surgery or healing of bone, most people are candidates. If there is very little bone to work with , often grafting can be done, or other specialized techniques utilized. The use of certain drugs for osteoporosis can be a concern and increase the risk of complications. Read more...
Almost everyone! With careful treatment planning after taking comprehensive records on a patient, almost everyone is an implant candidate! some individuals might be straight forward and some might need some extra steps to prepare the spot in their mouths to have the implants placed, but that being understood, nearly every basically healthy person is a viable candidate. Read more...
Yes. Today on edge it very rare to find limitation to place an implant. Real limitations are medical or psycological issues, but are very few. So almost everybody can have implants in their mouth. It is my first treatment option for any missing tooth. Read more...
No. There are patients considered not a good candidate for dental implants. Patients with immunosuppressive diseases, patients with history of head and neck radiation therapy, recent myocardial infarction; patients on intravenous bisphosphonate. Read more...
No. There are multiple medical complications and patient treatment histories that eliminate certain patients as qualified candidates for implants. In addition, certain anatomical situations, such as inadequate bone support in the implant area, mitigate against implants unless bone augmentation procedures are conducted prior to implant consideration. Read more...
For most people, yes. Dental implants are placed in relatively healthy patients. For some patients there may be an insufficient amount of bone to support a dental implant; in many of these cases the bone quality can be enhanced with grafts. Dental implants are not recommended for those who smoke. There must be an adequate amount of space between existing teeth as well; too small a gap would prevent the recommendation. Read more...
Adults not children! As others have said, adequate bone support, systemic good health and good surgical technique will give successful results in adults. However, they are not recommended for children under 22, especially in the visible smile zone since the "height " of their surrounding teeth and gums will change and the implants "height" will remain the same thereby creating a cosmetic failure. Read more...

What are dental implants made from?

Med grade titanium. A typical implant consists of a titanium screw (resembling a tooth root) with a roughened or smooth surface. The majority of dental implants are made out of commercially pure titanium, which is available in 4 grades depending upon the amount of carbon and iron contained.[10] more recently grade 5 titanium has increased in use. Grade 5 titanium, titanium 6al-4v. Read more...
Tiitanium. Most are made of titanium which is a very compatible and non reactive in the body. Read more...
Titanium & zirconia. Titanium is by far the most popular. There are now newer implants made of zirconia (ceraroot) which is white ceramic and shown in limited studies to be as successful. Read more...
Titanium. Medical grade titanium is used to fabricate dental implants as we know them today. This is the most successful metal used. Many other substances have been tried over the centuries. Read more...
Titanium* Most implants are made of titanium. Zirconium implants are also available. Many people think that zirconium is a porcelain. Some dentists even call zirconium implants metal free holistic alternative to metal titanium implants. But the educated person knows that zirconium is a metal and not ceramic. (its in the same column as titanium on the periodic table. Read more...
Titanium. Titanium is a surgically pure metal that has been used in orthopedic surgery for over 60 years. Dental implant websites have great information for the public about the process by which the implants are made, and their success rates. Read more...
Titanium preferred . The use of materials other than titanium has been tried over the years. Each has it's own draw backs. Overall , the prosthetics, as well as the basic implant is best served with titanium. Zirconium can be used for the post, placed in the titanium, but these materials do not lend themselves to modification if need to provide the end result. Read more...
Bruxism. The term "tmj" refers to the tempromandibular joint and very often the tmjd "tmj dysfunction" can be treated with a night guard to minimize grinding, (bruxism) try a professionally made guard before you do anything else. Read more...
Short answer no. The store bought bite guards do nothing since it is critical that they fit and "bite" properly. They may increase the grinding. Read more...
High bite. If cold sensitivity persists, all else ok, the filling could be a a little high. Minor adjustment to correct, see your dentist . Read more...
Try not to pull it. Often a fractured tooth can be restored. Once gone, a none replaced tooth can create further loss of teeth. Do not assume it will need to be extracted. See your dentist. Read more...
Grooves along gum line. Grinding can create grooves at gum line along with wear facets on the biting surfaces. You probably need a professionally made bite guard. Read more...
Fairly soon. If not replaced, the extraction site will heal. It is opinion that you will loose 10 to 12% of the bone around the socket within 3 to 4 months. Ifar prefer to remove the tooth and at the same time place an implant into the socket. This will actually preserve bone and return use to the area. Read more...
Excess bone. Most likely an excess of bone, totally benign called a torus. These often are there for long times until you find it for some reason. See your dentist. Read more...
Titanium. Titanium (a mteal alloy) with a variety of surface coatings (sprayed ha, sand blasted, etched, etc...) is by far the most widely used material for dental implants. There are over 50 years of scientific studies that document the terrific success rate this material has when fusing to bone. Recently a ceramic material (zirconium) has started to be used and show promise, but the studies aren't long. Read more...
Tantalum too! Tantalum, one of the earliest successful implant materials, has recently been reintroduced into dentistry. Advances in making the metal porous (zimmer dental) allows bone to grow into the body of the implant. Porous tantalum implants purportedly exhibit properties of both surface osseointegration found with titanium implants and osseoincorporation (fda approve term) for a quicker restoration. Read more...
Special titanium. Just as with artificial hip joints and knee joints, these dental implants are made of titanium. All implants have a specially treated surface which allows for the jaw bone to bond or connect or biointegrate into the implant faster. These implants are amongst the most successful procedures we have in dentistry. Read more...
A Titanium Alloy. Most quality dental implants are made from a titanium alloy. Since titanium is an inert metal, there is no chance of having your body reject it. The same type of alloy is used in hip and knee replacements as well. Current technology has also developed an all ceramic dental implant. Since it is relatively new, we do not have enough long-term studies to suggest it's viability as a good treatment. Read more...
Ti, Zir, or Ta. While titanium (commercially pure ti, or medical grade to) is still primary material for dental implants, the use of zirconia implants are getting more attention specially in europe ; asia , specially japan. But due to restorative issues, not settled in usa yet. The tantalum implants while are already in orthopedic field for several years, they don't have a proved track record yet, but promising. Read more...
Titanium, Zirconia. The most common material is titanium. However, zirconia has been found to have similar properties. It is naturally white and metal free, making it a popular dental material. A common solution is to place a titanium implant and use zirconia for the abutment, which is the part that may affect the appearance of the restoration. Read more...
Titanium- Zirconium. The implant is a small part made of titanium or titanium zirconium alloy. This materials generally well-tolerated by the human body. Read more...
Titanium. The most common implant material is titanium. It has a unique ability to bond with bone tissue. The discovery of that ability, which was named osseointegration, was the foundation for dental implant technology. Unlike previously attempted materials, titanium is not rejected by the body. Instead, it essentially becomes part of the bone, just like a tooth root. Titanium is strong, biocompatible, and. Read more...
Tooth replacement. Imagine a dental implant as a fake root of a tooth , if you have a missing tooth or teeth you can replace them with dental implants . Read more...
Implant materials. Dental implants are made of titanium alloy which integrates well with the bone and has shown no cases of allergy or negative reactions. Zirconia (ceramic) implants are also available but of limited design availability, meaning they need to be placed and a crown inserted at the same time which may not be possible in all situations. Titanium implants can be immediate loaded or delayed loading. Read more...

How successful are dental implants?

Great 95% Dental implants have been studied more intensely than any other procedure know in dentistry or medicine. It was studied for 15 years before it was available. Now with 37 year we can definitively say that the chances of success are upwards to 95%. Limitating factor are the skill and knowledge of the surgeon and restorative dentist. Read more...
Dental implants... Dental implants currently have over a 97% success rate. When done properly (and cared for properly) they should last a lifetime. Read more...
Very. Depending on the skill of the surgeon dental implant success rate range from 90-100%. Read more...
Very. One of the best bets you can make in your lifetime. Success rates in the upper 90 %. Read more...
Very successful. The success rate can. Be close to 95%, of course it depends on the quality ANS quantity of the bone and the experence of the dentist. Read more...
Highly successful, The integration of dental implants with the human body is one of if not the most successfu, longest lasting l and surprisingly the most comfortable dental procedures performed today! implants rarely fail. However, their crown retaining screws, their porcelain covering crown, and inflamed gums due to excess cement can lead to a premature restorative failure. Read more...
Very successful... Dental implants are amongst the most successful procedures available in dentistry. With this said they are not recommended for those who smoke. The five year success rate is easily over 90-95% of patients for those who they are recommended. Read more...
Dental Implants Yes. Dr. Misch an implant dental surgeon with over 40years of experience has documented the success rate compared to a three unit bridge. He surveyed 10k cases. Found that the bridges had a 34% failure rate at 16+ years. Dental implants had only a 3%over all failure rate at 20years. Most of these failures occurred during the 1st year. When done correctly they are the best treatment. Google Dr.Misch. Read more...
Very!!! Dental implants are very successful! The current root form implant design has been around for over 35 years and boosts over a 90% success rate... Much better than hip and knee replacements! The improvement in design, techniques and restorative options continue to improve, so if you require one, don't hesitate! Read more...
Very successful. Dental Implants are very successful in replacing a missing tooth or teeth with a 95% success rate. They function almost like your natural teeth in improving your smile, self confidence and health. The relative success of dental implants is dependent upon your bone density, general health and periodontal maintenance. Read more...
Success rate 93- 98% Success rates of dental implants is depending on where in the jaw the implants are placed but, in general, dental implants have a success rate of 93- 98%. Read more...
Over 90% Dental implants have a very high rate of success, well over 90 percent. Many analysts have studied large numbers of implant cases, and often quote statistics from about 92 to 98 percent success, sometimes higher. There is little agreement on a precise number, because the risk of failure depends on many factors, most importantly the skill of the dentist. Read more...
1/20. Approximately 95% successful. Meaning about 1 implant in every 20 that are placed may fail. This is not including medically-related contraindications such as: uncontrolled diabetes, severe bone degenerative disorders, previous history of advanced periodontal disease. Read more...

What is the cost of dental implants?

Variable. It is the same as everything else: you get what you pay for. You are paying for the experience, the education.... and the skills of the surgeon. Different dentists using the same system may charge differently based on how much work and steps they plan to do, you need to visit the office, meet the doctor and get a thorough exam before deciding if the price is the issue. (1500 to 5,000.00) . Read more...
Depends on use! A dental implant is actually a titanium substitute for the root of a tooth. Implants can be used to anchor one tooth to a full arch of teeth. Usually the fees are divided up into the cost of the implant and the cost of the tooth(teeth) replacement. That being said, a single implant can range from $900 to $2000. The difference is the type, skill of the surgeon, implant design, location in USA. Read more...
$1200 to $3000 . The advantages of having dental implants are the natural look, feel and function of real teeth and they are a permanent solution for missing teeth. The costs of dental implants will vary depending on your geographical location. The average fee for one implant ranges from $1200 to $3000. Just remember, if the maintenance is done properly, dental implants can last a lifetime. . Read more...
Get what you pay for. Like most things in life, you get what you pay for. Dental implant prices vary from region to region in the U.S., but a safe range for a dental implant is between $1,400-2,100. There will usually be an additional charge for the crown to go on top of the implant as well. Read more...
It varies. The cost of dental implants includes the implant surgery, the prosthetic component that fits onto the implant and the restoration supported by the implant, in addition to any grafting procedures that are used to compensate for any deficient tissues. Check with your dentist regarding your specific situation. Read more...
Variable. There are 2 major costs involved. 1. Surgical placement of the implant itself. This can range from $1800 - 3000 depending on the Dr. and where the tx. is done. 2. restoration placed on the implant. Usually a crown. This may range from $1600 - 2300. Much depends on the charges for the components, implant manufacturer, type and experience of the doctors,etc. BE SURE to get only top brand implants. Read more...
Implant. Are you getting one single implant with a crown, or a quadrant or full arch of teeth? have you lost bone to the point where you need additional bone grafting to create a proper surgical site ? Will your dentist do a CT Scan prior( really a good idea) ? There are a lot more ?'s to be answered than 400 characters. Contact your dentist. Read more...
$1500 to $3000. there are many fractures in the cost of the dental implant, but in general the price ranges from $1500 to $3000 for an implant. Read more...
Shop around. The cost can vary widely, even in the same city. Call a few officies and ask how much they charge. And don't forget to ask about the price to restore the implant (put a tooth on it). they can be separate costs or the office may offer a complete package...The IMPLANT, the ABUTMENT (optional sometimes) and the CROWN. Good luck. Read more...
2000-2500. Be careful with doctors advertising cheap implants. This is the price without the crown for a titanium implant. Ceramic implants cost more. Read more...
Variable. The price of everything varies by geographical location, difficulty of procedure, possible grafting, abutment and type of final restoration. If we are talking about a 'simple' implant surgery, usually the implant itself is around $1500-$2000, the abutment can be around $500-$1200, and the final restoration varies by type and price to the point of individual Tx only. Grafting will increase cost. Read more...
Varies. Best bet is to get an estimate from a dentist who can actually treat you. In this way you have a reference point. Any numbers given to you over the internet are meaningless. Read more...
Implant cost. Can range anywhere from $1500-$3000 just for the implant (screw that replaces the root). Depending on if you only need one or several they will also need to be restored with attacents to hold in dentures, abutments for crowns and then whatever you decide you want on the implant. An attachment for a denture ranges between $800-$1500 and an implant crown ranges anywhere from $1250-$2500. so $4-5k . Read more...
It varies. Depending on the type mini or standard, number involved, any associated surgery such as grafts. It is like asking "What is the cost of a car or cost of a house?" Consult with a dentist for an answer tailored to your specific needs. . Read more...
Wide range. You can see by the previous answers that a wide range of costs exists. Lowest cost not the best idea. Quality counts. Read more...
Broad range! The fees really depend on many factors: the health of the bone in the site, the specific implant best suited for the area and final type of restoration planned. Also, there's always a slim chance of rejection that would lead to additional treatment needed in the area prior to other treatment options. Best to consult your pop dentist and surgeon for best choices for you. Read more...
Average is $3500. Average is $3500 in US with the range between 2000 and $5000 depending on location and size of town. This is implant and crown not including extra treatment needed that . Read more...
$3000 each. Dental treatment can be expensive, but it is always worth the cost. Modern dentistry is high quality and lasts. Find a doctor you are comfortable with and talk about your options. Then make arrangements to fit your lifestyle and budget. Read more...
Depends. Depends on the area of the country you are in, but a general guideline for the implant alone is $1200-$2500. A single implant with the connector and crown can range from $2500-$5000. Good luck and have a blessed day!! Read more...
Varies. The cost varies depending on the doctor placing the implant and what type of implant is placed. My recommendation is to see a good periodontist who has been placing implants for about 5 years. The cost would around $2000. Read more...
Wide Range. Most patients dental implant treatments are not exactly alike . The number of appointments, procedures and cost of dental implants varies depending on the patient. Read more...
Cost. Cost will vary depending where you live and what is planned. Most dentists will provide a treatment plan outlining costs involved. Read more...

What is it like to get dental implants?

Not bad. Simple dental implants are usually an easier process than a tooth extraction. There are times when additional procedures like sinus lifts and grafts have to be done that may bring on some mild post op discomfort or prolonged healing. Overall, they are a rey predictable procedure. Read more...
Uneventful. Most people will say they felt nothing, and a lot say they have had worse fillings. It really shouldn't be a bad experience. Like most things, it isn't as bad as we all think. Read more...
Relatively easy. You will be numb and not feel a thing. Afterwards you can expect some mild to moderate discomfort that can be easily handled with mild to moderate pain medication. Many patients only need advil, motrin, aleve (naproxen) or a similar medication. I had one done on myself and it was not bad at all. I only needed one pain pill and was fine in a few hours. Read more...
Natural teeth. Most of my patients report it is less discomfort than extraction. Every patient also say i wish i would have done this years ago. Read more...
Very Routine. Having dental implant treatment is a very routine procedure today. The techniques and instruments have made undergoing dental implant surgery very safe, comfortable, and predictable. You will be numb during the procedure, and it only takes a few minutes to actually place the implant by an experienced surgeon. You may feel some vibration or pressure, but no discomfort at all. Keep smiling ! Read more...
Smooth and easy. Having a dental implant procedure usually runs very smooth. However, if many dental implants with bone grafting are required, some patients may elect to be sedated. Discuss your procedure with your dentist. Read more...
Minimal. Some surgeons place implants without anesthetic in mandibular areas because bone has minimal nerve ennervation. Heat to the mandibular nerve is assumed to indicate closeness to the nerve. I think i would do it the old fashioned way if it was being done on me. Read more...
Easier than extract. With an extraction a usually infected tooth is ripped out of an infected socket yielding an open wound for bacteria to grow. That is the definition of trauma. An implant is a precision drilled hole in a healthily site that is instantly sealed by the implant. Sure there is a little soreness, but compared to an extraction it's usually a piece of cake! Read more...

What are the effects of dental implants?

None. If dental implants are placed well with proper technique and integration with the bone takes place, then there are virtually no side affects. Read more...
Bone stabalization. Dental implants keep the jaw bone from deteriorating away after a tooth is pulled. Dentists can anchor teeth to them individually or a full set of teeth to a series of them. Sometimes people who wish to have an implant placed to replace a tooth they lost years ago can not do so without augmenting the jaw bones height and/or width to allow for implant placement. Read more...
Great way... To replace missing or lost teeth. Read more...
Titanium allergies. While rare, titanium "sensitivities" have been well documented with medical and dental implants. Alternative choices are zirconium implants, tatalum implants or no implants! Read more...
Replace lost teeth. The primary side effect of dental implant(s) is to replace missing a tooth (teeth). While there are the obvious issues that are associated with any surgery, in regards to implant surgery and restorative treatment, the soreness, swelling (if any) and inconvenience are minimal. In the end, your missing tooth/teeth are replaced and your quality of life is improved! Read more...

How painful it is to get dental implants?

Painless. The procedure is painless. You'll be given local anesthetics, or if you prefer, you can be put to sleep. Either way, you won't feel a thing. Read more...
Not much. It shouldn't hurt anymore than when you had the tooth pulled out at the most. Read more...
Easier than extract. With an extraction a usually infected tooth is ripped out of an infected socket yielding an open wound for bacteria to grow. That is the definition of trauma. An implant is a precision drilled hole in a healthily site that is instantly sealed by the implant. Sure there is a little soreness, but compared to an extraction it's usually a piece of cake! Read more...
No. Having had two dental implants placed on myself and having assisted in hundreds of implant surgeries, I can say with confidence, that the placement of a dental implant, even when a tooth is extracted, using profound local anesthesia is not painful. Even after the numbness wears off, you'll find yourself a little sore, nothing Motrin or Aleve (naproxen) can't handle. . Read more...
Without pain. dental implants may sound like an oxymoron, but new techniques and advanced anesthesia are making it a reality for many patients. It helps you maintain your natural smile, continue eating the foods you love and improve your general health. The best tooth replacement treatment ever. Read more...
Not very. If you see well-trained specialists, the pain level is low. At By Design Dental Implant Center, we do full mouth extractions, place implants in both jaws and place fixed temporary teeth in the same day. The next day most all our patients report taking one "pain pill" to be sure they slept and then only ibuprofen.Pain primarily related to gum tissues and sutures.Fewer implants even easier.Good Luck. Read more...
Not painful at all. I tell my patients they will ally feel more pressure with an extraction than a dental implant. Once the proper local anesthesia is given sit back relax and do t fear any pain. Read more...
Seldomly so... Implant placement can cause pain when there is: -Aggressive site preparation and/or lack of adequate irrigation resulting in the "burning" of the bone. -Impingement of biologic structures (Nerve/Sinus perforation), which can be solved by getting a CT scan. -Improper pain management. I've placed over 150 implants. No complaints yet. The above issues are not a problem for most. Good luck. Read more...
Not very painful. They are not very painful all. Most can be placed with local anesthetic. Usually over the counter pain relievers are given for any spot operative discomfort. Read more...
Not painful at all. Getting dental implants is not painful and the dentist will numb the area with Novacaine to make the visit painfree. Recovery you may have some tenderness but that can be easily managed with Ibuprophen or similar meds. Read more...