Related Questions

Which type of medicine do you get for knee arthritis?

NSAIDs . Assuming the arthritis being asked about is osteoarthritis.....The most common first line medicine is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (nsaid). Many fall in this category including naprosyn, (naproxen) ibuprofen, diclfenac, etc. If these medications and physical therapy fail, then injections with local anesthetics and corticosteroids are often recommended. Read more...

What is a good exercise for a person with knee arthritis?

No running! Body as a whole, or knee. I favor cycling outdoors, because your body weight is off the knee and you are not dropping weight in stride which can bring nearly 1000 lbs of force on the knee joint. A schwinn airdyne is very good, because you also use arms and spread the work to upper extremity as well. Isometric exercises are also helpful! Read more...

What're some ways to loosen up a stiff knee (arthritis)?

Low-impact exercise. Riding the stationary bike or using the eliptical machine and judiciously using anti-inflammatory medications (follow the label) can help with your symptoms. Icing the knee is also helpful. Read more...

I have bad knee arthritis, is the elliptical machine the best?

Low impact is good. Low impact activities such as walking, elliptical and swimming are good exercises for knee arthritis. However, if you have significant arthritis in your knee cap, it is better to keep the incline at a lower level on the elliptical. With knee cap arthritis, the deeper the knee bend (flexion), the more stress on the knee cap. Experiment with different exercises, keep a log and track what is best. Read more...

Is fluid in the knee arthritis or osteoarthritis?

Varies. There are multiple potential causes for fluid in the knee. The fluid itself can be from an injury, inflammation, or other causes. Osteoarthritis is one type of arthritis. If there is concern about the nature of the fluid in the knee, it can be drawn out and sent to the lab to see what it is. An MRI is a test that can look for other associated conditions as well. Consider being seen. Read more...

I have knee arthritis and a meniscus tear. What should I do?

Knee Pain. What are your symptoms? Does it prevent you from doing activities or activities of daily living. Do you have swelling, locking or giving way. What you due is dependent on your symptoms and how it impacts your life. This includes adaptive exercises, medications, injections and surgery. Read more...
Arthritis & meniscus. If mild arthritis with primarily well-defined tear that is causing mechanical symptoms, then scope. If just mild degenerative meniscus without mechanical symptoms(locking, etc), then treat the arthritis primarily. Read more...

What are some of the alternative treatments for knee arthritis?

Knee arthritis. Depending on the degree of damage, there is glucosamine and chondroitin supplements, steroid knee injections, synthetic joint fluid injections to attempt to salvage cartilage, and then joint replacement. Read more...

Is a larger range of motion without pain indicative of knee arthritis?

Not sure. Range of motion depends upon many things, including arthritis, joint irregularities (tears or loose bodies, for example), capsular tightness, as well as large body habitus--large amount of fatty tissue behind the knee. Read more...

What can a doctor do for knee arthritis in an athletic teenager?

Yes. The first question is the cause of the arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis have excellent treatments. Osteoarthritis in a teen is uncommon. There are medications, physical therapies as well as complementary therapies that can all be helpful. Read more...
Not arthritis. Most likely this is not arthritis, but an overuse injury called "patello-femoral" syndrome. As a former baseball catcher, i know what that feels like. It's a chronic tendonitis issue. Icing the knees down after the sport, and taking Ibuprofen or Naproxen (alleve) can help with the inflammation, but nothing helps more than rest. Arthritis is destructive inflammation of the joint. Read more...