Treatments for stress fracture?

Cast shoe and rest! This depends on where the fracture is located. In my practice i advise elevation, rest and Motrin as well as ice in the immediate phase. I also always refer to a podiatrist as they are expert in the causes and treatment of this condition.

Related Questions

What are the treatments for foot stress fractures?

Cast. Most foot fractures are treated with cast immobilization or cam walkers certain fractures which are displaced may need to have open fixation to get the best fracture alignment and healing. Read more...
DEPENDS. I either use a CAM boot or surgical shoe. Then, WB or NWB. Every patient is different. AND STOP SMOKING! Read more...

What is the recommended treatment for a stress fracture? What if you don't treat it?

Relative Rest. Stress fractures are overuse injuries. Mainstay of treatment is rest. Requires athlete's injury be placed in whatever is necessary to eliminate pain. Casting/crutches for le injuries may be necessary. In some activity modification without bracing or immobilization may suffice. Underlying hormonal, vitamin deficiencies corrected. Training errors identified. If untreated may progress to fracture. Read more...

Whats the treatment for a navicular stress fracture?

See below. Navicular can be foot or wrist, either way, it needs to be seen by an orthopedist for hand or foot or podiatrist for foot. Navicular fractures in the wrist can be problematic and result in a vascular necrosis of the bone. Get seen. Read more...
Casting . This needs a cast until the fracture heals or it can go on to a nonunion and require surgery. Read more...
Navicular . If it is in the foot , see a podiatrist . He/she will guide you in the course of treatment. Do this sooner rather than later. Good luck. Read more...

Is it possible to have a fifth metatarsal stress fracture for possibly 2 years without knowing or seeking treatment? Or would the pain be unbearable?

Not likely. I guess anything is possible, but I would think symptoms would develop as the weeks went by. Typically, swelling and pain would limit your ability to function normally. I have had patients continue with their activity, on a reduced scale, and eventually recover, however, in substantially less than 2 years. Read more...